Archive for the ‘Health Policy’ Category

Superficial Transparency in Nutrition Research

December 12, 2017 — The food industry wants to sell you food. And the industry frequently uses nutrition research to do it. For many good reasons, scientific journals require disclosures of conflict of interest. But in a new JAMA viewpoint, John Ioannidis and John Trepanowski submit that these routine disclosures are not adequate for nutrition research. Superficial transparency is not […]

Wrestling with the Delicate Language of Obesity

December 11, 2017 — Maybe it’s progress. Five years ago social media was full of explicitly hateful fat-shaming content. More often than not, complaints fell on deaf ears. But Friday, we learned that Google now considers merely asking about the word fat to be distasteful and offensive. Google Surveys will no longer ask people what they think about the […]

Serving Up More Shame in Children’s Movies

December 9, 2017 — Movies offer an escape from harsh realities, right? That’s the conventional wisdom to explain why we watch. But a new analysis published in the December issue of Pediatrics suggests that’s not entirely true. A child being bullied about body weight can be pretty sure that the most popular children’s movies will include fat shaming messages. […]

Setting a Goal to Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

December 8, 2017 — Sensational headlines have been hiding a serious story this week. NBC tells us that diet shakes and dropping sodas can reverse diabetes. But behind those headlines lies an important study and an even more important concept. Obesity care specialists and researchers are finding ways to reverse type 2 diabetes through better clinical care. To be […]

Can Dietary Guidelines Save the Planet?

December 5, 2017 — To find the intersection of two contentious issues, look no further than the environment and dietary guidelines. On the environment, the current U.S. administration is busy wiggling out of commitments to reduce carbon emissions. On dietary guidelines, battles rage on multiple fronts – fats, red meat, and sugar are all hot topics. Undeterred, brave Dutch scientists […]

NEJM: Childhood Obesity Prevention Won’t Be Enough

November 30, 2017 — Facts are stubborn. And today, one of the stubborn facts of obesity is a bit more clear. Prevention alone is not enough. Late yesterday in the New England Journal of Medicine, some leading advocates for childhood obesity prevention wrote: A narrow focus solely on preventing childhood obesity will not avert potential future health damage that may be induced by […]

This Is Nuts! No Nuts in Chock Full o’Nuts?

November 29, 2017 — Inexplicably, the folks who have been selling us Chock Full o’Nuts coffee for roughly 80 years have decided to fess up. Their coffee is not chock full of nuts. In fact, it has no nuts whatsoever. The new packaging says so. Boldly. Right on the label. Clearing Up Confusion Chock Full o’Nuts is a New York […]

Just How Toxic Is Screen Time?

November 25, 2017 — Jean Twenge and her colleagues have a pretty dire story to tell you. It’s all about the toxic effects of screen time on our youth: In just the five years between 2010 and 2015, the number of U.S. teens who felt useless and joyless – classic symptoms of depression – surged 33 percent in large […]

Name It, Shame It, Call It Out?

November 23, 2017 — We can’t ignore it. The Scarlet S – shame – is everywhere in the news. And it’s a coin with two sides. On one side of this coin, the Scarlet S is riding high. Women are shaming awful men who assaulted, abused, and harassed them. And everyone is hoping for a turning point toward a more just […]

Obesity? Come Back and See Us When You Have Diabetes

November 22, 2017 — We have a long climb ahead of us. A new study published in the International Journal of Obesity this week makes it clear. Health plans still are not taking obesity care seriously. A careful analysis of coverage for obesity drugs documents what we’ve known for some time. Coverage is spotty at best. Health plans seem […]