Archive for the ‘Scientific Meetings & Publications’ Category

Making Peace with Bariatric Surgery for Teens

February 26, 2017 — The medical benefits of bariatric surgery for teens with severe obesity has become increasingly clear as trials such as the Teen-LABS study are providing more data on long-term outcomes. In Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology this month, two more studies (here and here) provide evidence for long-term benefits. Subjective Resistance But the more difficult hurdle is […]

Do Morning People Have More Healthful Meals?

February 24, 2017 — Morning meals have a way of creeping into our reflections on healthy dietary patterns. Questions about breakfast’s effect on weight, which plagued us for years, have mostly been settled. Skipping breakfast  won’t make you fat. But now along comes a study in the March issue of Obesity that raises a new question. Do morning people have […]

Liraglutide for Obesity Looking Like Diabetes Prevention

February 23, 2017 — An impressive new three-year study of 3 mg liraglutide for obesity (Saxenda) finds that this therapy provides a large reduction in the risk of developing diabetes in people who have prediabetes. Published yesterday in Lancet, investigators found an 80% reduction in the risk of progressing to diabetes. In a post-hoc analysis, they made further assumptions […]

Is Obesity a Disease? Do the Math

February 21, 2017 — A good friend who struggled all his life with severe obesity once confided to us: “Obesity isn’t really a disease, is it? I mean, you can’t catch it.” But, if you stop to do the math, it turns out that you can. Math models of disease transmission show that obesity can indeed spread through social […]

One Serving of Butter Doubles Diabetes Risk?

February 20, 2017 — Atrocious nutrition headlines are back. Health reporters are telling us that “eating two slices of buttered toast a day can double the risk of diabetes.” Fortunately, that’s not what the study says. The study was just published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. The data comes from a randomized, controlled study of the effects of […]

Different Foods Spark Different Parts of Your Brain

February 18, 2017 — It’s a complex puzzle. But your brain definitely responds in very complex ways when you spot some food. Food marketers know this at a practical level. They spend their lives figuring out ways to make you respond to images of their products. Neuroscientists are figuring it out at a more basic level. Functional MRI images […]

Surgery: Six Times Better for Controlling Type 2 Diabetes

February 16, 2017 — Today in the New England Journal of Medicine, five-year results of a randomized, controlled trial show that bariatric surgery is six times better than intensive medical treatment for controlling type 2 diabetes. That’s right. Six times better chances for success after five years. Without surgery, the outcomes were dramatically worse. This study, known as the […]

Trash Talk About Causality, Personality, and Obesity

February 15, 2017 — Causality captivates people when the subject is obesity. The appetite for understanding factors that cause obesity grows more insatiable as its health and economic impact grows more devastating. That appetite surely spurred a new publication in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. Gulay Avsar and colleagues developed a random effects model to […]

The Mystery of a Retracted Study That Came Back to Life

February 13, 2017 — A new paper in the February issue of Pediatric Obesity probes an important question. Can a gardening, cooking, and nutrition program exert an effect on obesity risk for Latino youth? At first glance, the results are encouraging. Right there in the title, the authors answer the question. The LA Sprouts program “reduces obesity and metabolic […]

Yes, Whole Grains Are the Real Deal for Metabolic Health

February 12, 2017 — Here’s a bit of nutrition advice that holds up pretty well under close scrutiny. Whole grains have been front and center in dietary guidelines for decades now. Epidemiology studies have long found that whole grains and dietary fiber correlate with health benefits such as better glycemic control, better insulin sensitivity, less heart disease, and less weight gain. Now, two new […]