Archive for the ‘Scientific Meetings & Publications’ Category

Zeroing In on Receptors That Cause Obesity

August 22, 2017 — Among the complex web of factors that are causing obesity to rise, you will find the rise of drugs that cause weight gain. New antipsychotic drugs – like olanzapine or Zyprexa – are classic examples. They offer important benefits for people living with schizophrenia or bipolar disease. But they have a downside. They can cause obesity and metabolic […]

The Stories Men Tell About Weight and Health

August 21, 2017 — Obesity is a very different experience for men and women. From an early age, weight and body image are front and center for women. By far, most participants in obesity studies are women. And roughly 80% of bariatric surgery patients are women.  So a new study of the stories men tell about weight and health […]

Maybe That Standing Desk Isn’t a Panacea

August 19, 2017 — Oops. Did you just drop a few thousand on that beautiful Jarvis Atwood standing desk? Well, a thing of beauty is a joy forever, so it’s not a bad purchase. But it might not save you from heart disease. A new study in the American Journal of Epidemiology finds that jobs where people mostly stand […]

The Tangled Relationship Between Obesity and Depression

August 17, 2017 — Obesity and depression seem to travel together. This link is a tricky one and the nature of the relationship presents a real challenge for scientists to unravel. But one thing is sure. These two diseases are rising in parallel. An Unmistakable Rise in Severe Psychological Distress Look no further than the dramatic rise in deaths […]

Veggie Virtuosos Playing with Their Food

August 16, 2017 — “Don’t” has certain limitations in shaping behavior. Any parent of a toddler can tell you. Perhaps someone told Dale Stuckenbruck, “Don’t play with your food!” If so, the direction didn’t work as intended. Nope. He founded Long Island Vegetable Orchestra. Along with other veggie virtuosos, he has a grand time playing with his food. At […]

Does Obesity Mess with Your Brain’s Reward Center?

August 14, 2017 — For several years now, neuroscientists have been looking for connections between obesity and how our brains process rewards. Dopamine receptors play a role in the reward you feel when you eat especially tasty foods. And prior research suggests people with obesity have fewer dopamine receptors. Now new research in Obesity shows that young adults with […]

Blowing Past Stigma and Telling the World Who We Are

August 11, 2017 — “I know all about you.” Those can be scary words, especially when someone says them out loud. And when they go unspoken, they can become a tremendous burden. For those of us living with obesity, those unspoken words become a dead weight that no scale can measure. That weight is stigma. Preparing to open YWM2017 […]

High Hopes and Hard Outcomes in Obesity Policy

August 9, 2017 — Public health policymakers have high hopes for reshaping the food environment to tackle obesity. In 2004, Kelly Brownell proposed that a toxic food environment lies at the root of the obesity epidemic. That idea has impressive staying power. But a new paper in PLOS ONE finds little cause for joy when it looks at the […]

Health at Risk: Connected (or Not), Isolated, and Lonely

August 8, 2017 — At the annual convention of the American Psychological Association Saturday, Professor Julianne Holt-Lunstad warned that feeling lonely may surpass obesity as a health risk. She said: Robust evidence suggests social isolation and loneliness significantly increase risk for premature mortality. The magnitude of the risk exceeds that of many leading health indicators. With an increasing aging […]

Moving Ahead Despite Imperfect Information in Obesity

August 5, 2017 — Yesterday, we had the privilege to present to a few hundred diabetes educators at AADE17 in Indianapolis. The subject was bias and how it interferes with progress against childhood obesity. So we spent a good bit of time talking about the abundance of imperfect information about obesity. The best question of the day came from […]