Archive for the ‘Scientific Meetings & Publications’ Category

Our Messy Love Affair with Butter

March 23, 2017 — “With enough butter, anything is good.” – Julia Child Author Elaine Khosrova says “I never gave up on butter.” In her recent book, she explains that it has a “rich history” woven into 10,000 years of human history. Ancient cultures revered it for curative and mystical qualities. As Julia Child knew, it is essential to French cuisine. […]

Chasing Good Heart Health in the Jungle

March 22, 2017 — Headlines flowed this week from a study about people in a remote corner of the Amazon jungle who have exceptionally good heart health. This study, published in Lancet, tells us that the Tsimane people of Bolivia have the lowest rates of coronary artery plaque ever seen in any population. This is one case where health […]

Progress on the Next Generation of Obesity Treatment

March 21, 2017 — Gratefully, we can report progress on the next generation of obesity treatment. For starters, John Blundell and colleagues have just published a controlled clinical trial of semaglutide in obesity. The study is a tightly controlled experiment to explain how the drug works. And beyond semaglutide, more options for treating obesity are moving into development. The […]

Obesity and Diabetes: Peel and Shake

March 19, 2017 — Simple solutions to complex problems are seductive. The dual epidemic of obesity and diabetes presents a pair of wicked problems, fused into one through a tight biological relationship. Surging rates of obesity plant the seeds for surging rates of type 2 diabetes. Severe obesity is a wickedly difficult medical problem, so simple solutions are appealing […]

Confessing to the Truth of Complexity in Obesity Policy

March 17, 2017 — Complexity makes lousy sound bites. That basic fact of political life makes good health policy for obesity maddeningly difficult. We start with the fact that obesity is a complex, chronic disease. And then that complexity is multiplied by a complex environment. Health policies to reduce obesity must influence that environment. To make good policy for obesity, confessing to […]

Will Corporate Wellness Save Fitbit?

March 15, 2017 — Is it time to feel a bit of pity for Fitbit? For that matter, maybe the corporate wellness industry deserves some sympathy. Both of them have hit some bumps lately and some observers are suggesting they can help each other out. The Motley Fool says corporate wellness programs “could be a game changer” for Fitbit. […]

When Impulses Strike in Obesity

March 14, 2017 — A simple fact of our food environment is that food cues surround us daily. Those food cues may prompt impulses to have a quick bite to eat. And different people respond differently to those impulses. Emerging evidence suggests that impulsivity plays a role in obesity risk. And new research published in Appetite suggests that it may play a […]

Making Sense of Big Shifts in Thinking About Weight

March 13, 2017 — For some time, we’ve known that people are thinking about weight differently. Last week, JAMA made it official. In a research letter, Kassandra Snook and colleagues describe a trend of fewer adults with excess weight and obesity trying to lose weight. A 17% Drop People Trying to Lose Weight The value of this new research is that […]

Drink More Water, Lose More Weight?

March 11, 2017 — Drink more water, Michelle Obama told us in the Let’s Move! campaign. She wasn’t the first with that advice. It’s everywhere. The presumption is that water can substitute for sweetened beverages, fill you up, and help you lose or maintain a lower weight. Thankfully, Julia Wong and colleagues from Boston Children’s Hospital tested that advice. […]

Gluten-Free Fad Diets Might Have a Diabetes Downside

March 10, 2017 — For millions of people who don’t really need a gluten-free diet, eating less gluten might actually have a downside. Research presented at the AHA Epi|Lifestyle meeting yesterday found that people who ate less gluten had a slightly higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The investigators found no difference in the risk of weight gain. […]