Archive for the ‘Scientific Meetings & Publications’ Category

Flaws in Pushing the Idea of Harmless Obesity

April 6, 2018 — So much energy goes into amping up the “crisis” of obesity that an equal and opposite reaction is natural. Surely, can’t a person be fat and fit? Aren’t there certain situation where a bit of extra adiposity can actually help a person’s health? But a series of recent papers challenges two concepts of harmless obesity […]

Does the Netherlands Have Obesity Under Control?

April 5, 2018 — Headlines tell us that the Netherlands has obesity under control. The most recent dispatch comes from BBC. Earlier this week it ran a story telling us “How Amsterdam is reducing childhood obesity.” We wonder. Has the Netherlands found the secret sauce for reversing obesity trends? Objective Evidence Is Important This cycle of Mission Accomplished headlines […]

Blind to the Biggest Drivers of Obesity?

March 31, 2018 — We’ve become blind to one of the biggest drivers of obesity. So says Julia Belluz – someone whom we rely upon for generally thoughtful writing about obesity. She’s reporting on a new study in Pediatrics about sports sponsorships used to promote food and soft drinks. Marketing Unhealthy Food and Beverages Marie Bragg and colleagues analyzed television viewing […]

The Obesity Pandemic Brings Cancer to Youth

March 28, 2018 — In the latest issue of Obesity, Nathan Berger provides a very clear picture of how obesity is bringing cancer into a younger population. He assembles evidence from more than 100 publications to demonstrate that 13 types of malignancies are shifting into younger age groups. Accelerating Progression Berger examines more than just the epidemiology that links […]

A Failing Grade on Knowledge of Obesity Care

March 26, 2018 — It’s hard to sugarcoat this. New research makes it very clear. Most primary care providers lack an adequate knowledge of obesity care. They simply don’t know basic facts of what works and what doesn’t for treating obesity. Recently, researchers from the George Washington University checked the knowledge of 1,506 primary care providers. The sample included […]

Freeze a Nerve for Weight Loss? Not So Fast!

March 25, 2018 — Here’s a bit of hype that crossed many screens this week. The Society of Interventional Radiology wants you to know that an experimental procedure to freeze a nerve may “ignite weight loss.” Ignite sounds good, right? Naturally, health reporters had fun hyping this one. Our favorite: “Freezing the ‘hunger nerve’ could be key to more […]

Serotonin and Obesity: It’s Not Just in Your Head

March 24, 2018 — Maybe it’s not on the tip of every tongue. But serotonin is a bit more familiar than most neurotransmitters. Most people think of it as a “happy hormone” for the central nervous system that becomes depleted in a state of depression. However, The GI system has far more of it than the CNS. And now, […]

The Breakfast-for-Weight-Loss Myth Strikes Again

March 21, 2018 — Some myths just won’t die. For example, consider the immortal myth of breakfast for weight loss. At ENDO 2018 in Chicago, researchers presented a small study and issued a press release. The study compared 39 patients with type 2 diabetes assigned to receive one of two different meal plans. One group ate just three meals […]

Denying Care to Teens with Severe Obesity

March 20, 2018 — Two bits of recent research add to our concern about care denied to teens with severe obesity. One study compares bariatric surgery to intensive medical care. Teens with type 2 diabetes and severe obesity had much better outcomes with bariatric surgery. But another shows that very few teens (0.7%) with severe obesity actually receive the […]

Reproducibility of Science: Look Twice Before Crossing

March 19, 2018 — Some call it a crisis of reproducibility. More than a decade ago, John Ioannidis famously told the world that most published research findings are false. His analysis quickly became the most widely read paper ever published by PLOS. You’ll find a more generous view in a new, special issue of PNAS. Attending to the rigor, […]