Posts Tagged ‘access to care’

A Double Dose of Discrimination

June 17, 2018 — A pair of presentations at the 31st Harvard Blackburn Course in Obesity Medicine reminds us of much work to do. We have an embarrassing gap in respectful and equitable care for people with obesity. Scott Kahan gave a compelling overview of weight bias and stigma. On top of that, Fatima Cody Stanford described the added heath […]

Costly Hurdles for Bariatric Surgery

May 29, 2018 — It’s hard to say exactly why we’ve put so many hurdles in the way of effective obesity care. But a new analysis in Medical Care shows us that these are costly hurdles. David Kim, David Arterburn, Sean Sullivan, and Anirban Basu find that cost sharing for bariatric surgery is a bad idea. Payers lose $7 […]

Putting Obesity Care Out of Reach Where It’s Needed Most

May 10, 2018 — The picture is stark. Writing in the Atlantic, Olga Khazan says bariatric surgery is out of reach where people need it the most. The five states with the highest rates of self-reported BMI in the range of obesity are WV, MS, AL, AR, and LA. But not one of those states requires insurers to cover […]

DIY Obesity Care, Self Blame, and Quality of Life

April 30, 2018 — Two new studies in Obesity point to a big opportunity lost for people living with obesity. Professional help with obesity can offer significant improvements in quality of life. And yet, 90% of the people who could benefit don’t get that help. DIY obesity care is the dominant strategy. DIY Obesity Care Andrew Stokes and colleagues […]

Respecting Truth and Personal Autonomy in Obesity

April 18, 2018 — Step right up! Many people are handing out unsolicited advice about obesity and what’s best for you. This sort of advice comes from two dramatically different extremes. We hear it from ignorant, biased individuals who think that solutions are easy. But it also comes from people who say, forget it. Obesity is no big deal […]

Health Insurance: New Rules, Higher Costs, Less Coverage

April 13, 2018 — You might have thought that all the news this week was about Syria and the FBI. You would be wrong. While everyone else was focused on those lovely distractions, CMS was busy issuing new rules for health insurance. The net effect is hard to predict. But broadly speaking, you can expect to see higher costs […]

Flaws in Pushing the Idea of Harmless Obesity

April 6, 2018 — So much energy goes into amping up the “crisis” of obesity that an equal and opposite reaction is natural. Surely, can’t a person be fat and fit? Aren’t there certain situation where a bit of extra adiposity can actually help a person’s health? But a series of recent papers challenges two concepts of harmless obesity […]

What’s the Real Harm of Repeated Weight Cycling?

April 4, 2018 — The common presumption is that losing weight and then regaining it will slowly, but surely cost you in terms of health. Reading, writing, and responding to your thoughts yesterday about Cass Elliot provided a stark reminder of this. Elliot – just like many other people who live with obesity – could lose large amounts of weight […]

The Obesity Pandemic Brings Cancer to Youth

March 28, 2018 — In the latest issue of Obesity, Nathan Berger provides a very clear picture of how obesity is bringing cancer into a younger population. He assembles evidence from more than 100 publications to demonstrate that 13 types of malignancies are shifting into younger age groups. Accelerating Progression Berger examines more than just the epidemiology that links […]

A Failing Grade on Knowledge of Obesity Care

March 26, 2018 — It’s hard to sugarcoat this. New research makes it very clear. Most primary care providers lack an adequate knowledge of obesity care. They simply don’t know basic facts of what works and what doesn’t for treating obesity. Recently, researchers from the George Washington University checked the knowledge of 1,506 primary care providers. The sample included […]