Posts Tagged ‘bias’

The Tangled Relationship Between Obesity and Depression

August 17, 2017 — Obesity and depression seem to travel together. This link is a tricky one and the nature of the relationship presents a real challenge for scientists to unravel. But one thing is sure. These two diseases are rising in parallel. An Unmistakable Rise in Severe Psychological Distress Look no further than the dramatic rise in deaths […]

The Language of Respect in Health and Wellness

August 6, 2017 — More and more, respectful language in health and wellness puts people first. Now, the new edition of the AP Stylebook includes guidance on writing about addiction that advises writers to use people-first language. Addiction is a disease. AP cautions against labeling people as addicts, alcoholics, users, and abusers. Language for Writing About Chronic Diseases This […]

What the Health: A Low-Fact Vegan Manifesto

July 31, 2017 — What the Health – a new documentary from the folks who brought you Cowspiracy – is generating quite a buzz for veganism. If you’re on board with the manifesto, you might be cheering and expecting a new wave of vegans to join you. But if you’re fussy about facts, this flick will make you fume. Wobbly Factoids Director and […]

Publication Bias at Work: The Case of Parks and Obesity

July 28, 2017 — Sometimes, objective evidence hits the wall against a very popular idea. Bam. Publication bias means that even a careful study might not see the light of day. Consider the case of public parks and obesity. The Indisputable Value of Public Parks Who can dispute the value that parks bring to our lives? They might prompt […]

Six Hard Questions to Ask About Obesity Cause and Effect

July 25, 2017 — Yesterday, Kevin Fontaine and David Allison opened their third conference on causality in obesity research at the UAB Nutrition and Obesity Research Center. They explained the growing urgency to ask hard questions about cause and effect in obesity. Targeting Elusive Causes for Obesity For three decades, obesity prevalence has been growing relentlessly. And yet, we […]

Jessamyn Stanley Teaches Us About Loving Every Body

July 16, 2017 — Jessamyn Stanley, author of the Every Body Yoga, deals gracefully with passive aggressive trolls who ask, “what about your health?” What about your health? Why are you asking such an intimate question? I can google. I know about heart disease and diabetes. And so Stanley has more than 300,000 devoted Instagram followers and a book […]

Spinning for a Noble Purpose Defeats the Purpose

July 10, 2017 — “We know what to do to reduce obesity,” says public health professor Simon Chapman. It’s a common sentiment. But data don’t always line up with that sentiment. When that happens, spinning the data – putting negative results in a positive light – becomes tempting. The PR team at the Harvard Chan School of Public Health provides […]

Making Frenemies with Childhood Obesity

July 9, 2017 — Wonder blob. Lindsay Averill received that nickname from middle school frenemies. They even made up a little song about it. Averill, now a women’s studies scholar and activist, has grown to be a closer friend with the woman who made up that song. And new research tells us that her experience is pretty common.  Having […]

Just How Bad Are Those TV Dinners?

July 8, 2017 — Here’s a bit of simple advice for eating healthy. Don’t eat in front of the TV. The advice is simple enough. But reality is not so simple. In a new study, Holly Raynor and Rachel Rosenthal found – to their surprise – that watching TV during a meal did not lead people to eat more. […]

Have People Stopped Worrying About Obesity?

July 7, 2017 — Today’s question crops up in many ways. We see research papers expressing fear that obesity is “becoming the new normal” or that parents are insufficiently concerned about their children’s weight. In this weight and fitness obsessed culture is it possible that people are not worrying enough about obesity? Fewer People Trying to Lose Weight Both […]