Posts Tagged ‘childhood obesity’

Serving Up More Shame in Children’s Movies

December 9, 2017 — Movies offer an escape from harsh realities, right? That’s the conventional wisdom to explain why we watch. But a new analysis published in the December issue of Pediatrics suggests that’s not entirely true. A child being bullied about body weight can be pretty sure that the most popular children’s movies will include fat shaming messages. […]

NEJM: Childhood Obesity Prevention Won’t Be Enough

November 30, 2017 — Facts are stubborn. And today, one of the stubborn facts of obesity is a bit more clear. Prevention alone is not enough. Late yesterday in the New England Journal of Medicine, some leading advocates for childhood obesity prevention wrote: A narrow focus solely on preventing childhood obesity will not avert potential future health damage that may be induced by […]

Just How Toxic Is Screen Time?

November 25, 2017 — Jean Twenge and her colleagues have a pretty dire story to tell you. It’s all about the toxic effects of screen time on our youth: In just the five years between 2010 and 2015, the number of U.S. teens who felt useless and joyless – classic symptoms of depression – surged 33 percent in large […]

A New Call for Putting Children First in Childhood Obesity

November 20, 2017 — A big gap just closed. At long last, we will be putting children first in childhood obesity. Until today, efforts to reduce the impact of childhood obesity have been mostly silent on the issue of shame and blame that children and families face with obesity. But today, the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Obesity Society […]

Does a Gastric Sleeve Affect Teen Brain Function?

November 1, 2017 — At ObesityWeek, the Obesity Journal Symposium is always a good bet and yesterday was no exception. Among five excellent papers, one was especially intriguing – a study of how a gastric sleeve affects teen brain function. It was a small, but careful study with tantalizing results. Alaina Pearce and colleagues studied 36 patients in one active […]

Ten Things Not to Miss at ObesityWeek 2017

October 25, 2017 — The excitement is rising. The world’s top obesity researchers, clinicians, and policymakers will soon be arriving in Washington’s National Harbor for ObesityWeek 2017. If you’re going to be there, you better plan ahead. this year, the meeting will have twice as much basic science, twice as much health policy, and three times as many late-breaking […]

Prevention That Sounds Too Good to Be True

October 24, 2017 — It’s an easy trap. Prevention is a cherished goal for childhood obesity. Behavioral economics has such a strong cachet that it just earned Richard Thaler a Nobel Prize. So when elegant research that says little nudges – like a sticker on a piece of fruit – can lead children to make better food choices, we want to […]

Balancing Hope and Facts in Childhood Obesity

October 17, 2017 — Hope and facts live together in an uneasy relationship. We have an excellent example before us as we digest the latest trends in childhood obesity. Specifically, we’re looking at the prevalence in children between the ages of two and five. In new statistics for 2016, the number reached a new high: 13.9%. Perhaps you recall […]

Can We Get Real? Obesity Rates Are Up Again

October 13, 2017 — Happy talk makes us impatient. Today, new data on obesity are out from the CDC and they are not good. Yet again, the U.S. is setting new records for obesity rates. Among adults the prevalence is now up to 39.6%. For children and youth, it’s up to 18.5%. Most notably, a big jump came in […]

Child’s Play: Mixing Values with Data

September 19, 2017 — How can insignificant results be clinically significant? It happens. Especially when researchers believes that their program must have a big effect. Consider this conclusion from a recent study of an program to promote more play: Although the differences between intervention and control were not statistically significant, the effect size indicates clinical significance. Promoting Physical Activity Through Child’s Play […]