Posts Tagged ‘evidence based medicine’

Inspiring Weight Loss Meets Stubborn Biology and Daily Life

January 4, 2017 — Inspiration season has arrived. So for the next few weeks, health and lifestyle reporters will bury us with inspiring weight loss stories. These stories feature people who turn their lives and health around through force of will and strength of character. Of course, most of these people have been at it for less than a year. First […]

Fake News Headlines About Saturated Fat

December 13, 2016 — Please, someone hit the pause button on all the fake news headlines about saturated fat. They’ve been burying us all year long, with no sign of a respite. Presently, you can find a fresh batch of such headlines telling you: Saturated Fat Could Be Good for You Saturated Fat Is Actually Good for You Fat […]

A Real Celebrity Weight Loss Secret: Evidence-Based Care

December 12, 2016 — Ever watch a movie and wonder: what did it take for an actor or actress to get rock hard, 6-pack abs? Certainly, special effects have their role. But if you were to believe the magazines in the grocery store checkout line, you would find the secret to Hugh Jackman’s “Wolverine” look is hydration, Gingko, and […]

Five Doses of Good News on Type 2 Diabetes in 2016

December 11, 2016 — It’s been a long slog, but this year brought at least five doses of good news on the subject of type 2 diabetes. Here’s our take. Preventing Cardiovascular Deaths. This year brought windfall of good news on cardiovascular outcomes with three of the newest drugs for type 2 diabetes. Just last week, empagliflozin (Jardiance) was […]

Are Randomized Controlled Trials Overrated?

November 27, 2016 — Randomized controlled trials are either a nuisance or a godsend – just depending on the question at hand and the questioner. A recent kerfuffle about flossing has people (like Jamie Holmes at New America) suggesting that they might be overrated. Writing in the New York Times Holmes says: Experiments, of course, are invaluable and have, in the past, shown the consensus […]

Weight Regain, Microbes, and Yo-Yo Reporting

November 25, 2016 — How does a mouse study about the role of gut microbes in weight regulation become a study of “yo-yo dieting?” The answer, unfortunately, is heavy-handed academic public relations and sloppy health reporting. The case in point is a perfectly good mouse study published yesterday in the journal Nature. The authors found evidence in mice that […]

Forget the Health Sites, Dolly Has Better Health Advice

November 22, 2016 — You might think a magazine or website devoted to health is the best place to look for health advice. But unfortunately, you would be wrong about that. A new study of the health advice in popular Australian magazines concludes: Australian magazines, especially those with health in the title, generally presented poor quality, unreliable health advice. Teen […]

Mangled Messages about Saturated Fats

October 19, 2016 — Depending on what you read, you might be firm in your faith that replacing saturated fats with polyunsaturated fats is a good strategy for reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease. Or your might wonder about sensational ideas advanced by health reporters like Sandy Hingston and Nina Teicholz. Hingston says “USDA screwed up the American diet – and […]

Blowing Off Steam Will Give You a Heart Attack?

October 12, 2016 — Here’s a clue for reading health news. When you see “linked,” “associated,” or “increased risk,” your antennae should go up. The report you’re reading might be science fiction. Case in point: sloppy reports about an observational study of self-reported emotions recalled after a heart attack. Circulation published the study yesterday. In this study, people who […]

Fitness Trackers Work – For Fitness

September 28, 2016 — Last week, JAMA published a randomized, controlled study that showed fitness trackers don’t help people lose weight. This week, Obesity published a systematic review and meta-analysis of how well fitness trackers work for their intended purpose – promoting fitness activities. Surprise, surprise: adding a fitness monitor to fitness programs seems to yield more physical activity. Herman […]