Posts Tagged ‘health economics’

Counting Pennies for Family-Based Childhood Obesity Care

August 30, 2017 — A new economic analysis published in Pediatrics leaves us with simple questions. Are we willing to pay for childhood obesity care? If we believe in family values, how do we value families? Cost-Effectiveness of Family-Based Childhood Obesity Care Teresa Quattrin and colleagues have previously demonstrated the effectiveness of family-based care for childhood obesity. And they […]

Surgery, Suffering, and Money in Obesity and Diabetes

July 20, 2017 — Does gastric bypass surgery save money for patients with obesity and diabetes? That’s the question a new study answers in Obesity this week. Suffering with a chronic disease – at least in the short term – is usually free. So finding savings would indeed be surprising in a two-year study such as this one. This study holds […]

The Looming Healthcare Drama for People with Obesity

June 17, 2017 — Here it comes. Behind closed doors, a repeal of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) is taking shape and all we have is speculation about what will be in it. Is this healthcare drama worth watching for people living with obesity? Will the result help or hurt us? What Matters: Pre-Existing Conditions Let’s be frank. The […]

Obesity: Chronic Care for a Chronic Disease

May 9, 2017 — Let’s connect the dots. Obesity is a complex, chronic disease. So says the American Medical Association. Chronic diseases require chronic care to prevent complications. So it makes sense that ongoing care would produce better outcomes. But even better, we now have evidence that chronic care saves money. A New RCT in The Lancet Amy Ahern […]

Maine: Another State Works on Better Obesity Care

April 15, 2017 — This chick hasn’t hatched. But the conversation is encouraging. Yesterday, Maine State Senator Nate Libby presented a bill in committee to reduce obesity and chronic disease rates in Maine by providing better obesity care. LD 1162: “An Act To Reduce the Incidence of Obesity and Chronic Disease in Maine” Specifically, Libby’s bill would provide better access […]

Moving from Obesity Myths to Theories

April 11, 2017 — Busting obesity myths is great sport. Those myths are are abundant, annoying, and problematic for people who want to move on to real solutions for the harms of obesity. Ruopeng An and Roland Sturm do a fine job of busting those myths, drawing upon their research funded by the Rand Corporation. Myth #1: Obesity Is an Epidemic of […]

An Economic Plague of Death, Despair, Diabetes, and Obesity

March 24, 2017 — Suffering shows up in many ways until it becomes unmistakable. Today at the Brookings Institution, Anne Case and Angus Deaton present their newest findings on a “sea of despair” among white working class Americans. People see this crisis in many different ways. All at once, it is an economic, medical, and human tragedy. An Economic Crisis […]

Neglecting Social Rank in Obesity Prevention Strategies

February 4, 2017 — By any objective measure, our current obesity prevention strategies are failing. Former CDC Director Tom Frieden said it bluntly in JAMA this week. “There has been no progress in reducing childhood obesity.” The latest obesity statistics in Mexico show the problem is still growing. That’s true even though Mexico passed a tax on sugary drinks and highly […]

Apples and Oranges, Soda Taxes and Surgery

January 27, 2017 — Here’s an unusual comparison. It contrasts the value of two different options for childhood obesity: a tax on sugary beverages versus bariatric surgery for adolescents. Steven Gortmaker and colleagues published this analysis in Health Affairs. Gortmaker presented the data yesterday in Washington, DC. Calling this an apples and oranges comparison would be generous. The basis for this comparison has two dimensions. First […]

No, Childhood Obesity Is Not Plateauing

January 13, 2017 — People opine every day about childhood obesity. Some of the words inform and some inflame. But most disturbing is constant flow of wishful reports that childhood obesity is plateauing. In December, headlines flowed with “good news” about “fewer chubby babies.” The cause was a study published in Pediatrics that, according to its authors, “cannot be considered representative […]