Posts Tagged ‘health outcomes’

Regressing to Prove a Point

December 10, 2017 — “Believe me” is a popular phrase lately. It flows freely from people working to prove a point. It works for someone with something to sell. But it doesn’t work well in scientific journals. Consider this case of a pilot weight intervention study for an older lesbian population. A Big Leap for Pilot Study The SHE […]

Setting a Goal to Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

December 8, 2017 — Sensational headlines have been hiding a serious story this week. NBC tells us that diet shakes and dropping sodas can reverse diabetes. But behind those headlines lies an important study and an even more important concept. Obesity care specialists and researchers are finding ways to reverse type 2 diabetes through better clinical care. To be […]

Can Dietary Guidelines Save the Planet?

December 5, 2017 — To find the intersection of two contentious issues, look no further than the environment and dietary guidelines. On the environment, the current U.S. administration is busy wiggling out of commitments to reduce carbon emissions. On dietary guidelines, battles rage on multiple fronts – fats, red meat, and sugar are all hot topics. Undeterred, brave Dutch scientists […]

Tracking Helps, Except When It Doesn’t

December 1, 2017 — “What gets measured gets managed.” This bit of wisdom from Peter Drucker got its start with Lord Kelvin. By now, the whole idea of tracking has become a bit of a holy grail for weight management. We get many prompts for tracking: weight, diet, and physical activity. And generally, keeping track of what we’re doing is […]

Just How Toxic Is Screen Time?

November 25, 2017 — Jean Twenge and her colleagues have a pretty dire story to tell you. It’s all about the toxic effects of screen time on our youth: In just the five years between 2010 and 2015, the number of U.S. teens who felt useless and joyless – classic symptoms of depression – surged 33 percent in large […]

Name It, Shame It, Call It Out?

November 23, 2017 — We can’t ignore it. The Scarlet S – shame – is everywhere in the news. And it’s a coin with two sides. On one side of this coin, the Scarlet S is riding high. Women are shaming awful men who assaulted, abused, and harassed them. And everyone is hoping for a turning point toward a more just […]

Obesity? Come Back and See Us When You Have Diabetes

November 22, 2017 — We have a long climb ahead of us. A new study published in the International Journal of Obesity this week makes it clear. Health plans still are not taking obesity care seriously. A careful analysis of coverage for obesity drugs documents what we’ve known for some time. Coverage is spotty at best. Health plans seem […]

A New Call for Putting Children First in Childhood Obesity

November 20, 2017 — A big gap just closed. At long last, we will be putting children first in childhood obesity. Until today, efforts to reduce the impact of childhood obesity have been mostly silent on the issue of shame and blame that children and families face with obesity. But today, the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Obesity Society […]

Soda’s Down, But Obesity’s Up. What Gives?

November 16, 2017 — We have a bit of good news and a bit of bad news in the soda-obesity war this week. The good news is that soda’s down. A new paper just published online in Obesity confirms what the industry has been saying for several years now. People are drinking less soda. In fact, they’re drinking less […]

Suddenly, Half the Population Has High Blood Pressure?

November 15, 2017 — In case you weren’t paying attention, 130 is the new 140. Before Monday, the threshold for high blood pressure was 140 over 90. Now the consensus is that it’s 130 over 80. Boom. Nearly half the population has hypertension. How’d that happen? The Landmark SPRINT Study Truthfully, this change didn’t happen overnight. The impetus to […]