Posts Tagged ‘health outcomes’

Surgery: Six Times Better for Controlling Type 2 Diabetes

February 16, 2017 — Today in the New England Journal of Medicine, five-year results of a randomized, controlled trial show that bariatric surgery is six times better than intensive medical treatment for controlling type 2 diabetes. That’s right. Six times better chances for success after five years. Without surgery, the outcomes were dramatically worse. This study, known as the […]

Trash Talk About Causality, Personality, and Obesity

February 15, 2017 — Causality captivates people when the subject is obesity. The appetite for understanding factors that cause obesity grows more insatiable as its health and economic impact grows more devastating. That appetite surely spurred a new publication in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. Gulay Avsar and colleagues developed a random effects model to […]

The Mystery of a Retracted Study That Came Back to Life

February 13, 2017 — A new paper in the February issue of Pediatric Obesity probes an important question. Can a gardening, cooking, and nutrition program exert an effect on obesity risk for Latino youth? At first glance, the results are encouraging. Right there in the title, the authors answer the question. The LA Sprouts program “reduces obesity and metabolic […]

Ready to Move Past Little Fibs in Eating Patterns

February 11, 2017 — Little fibs are among the biggest challenges in nutrition research. These little fibs show up in food diaries – self-reports of what a person in a nutrition study has eaten. People misremember, they fudge, or they might write down what they wish they had eaten. Mostly, people try to be honest, but little fibs add up […]

The Treacherous Quest for Healthy Fats

February 10, 2017 — Whether you’re reading consumer or scientific literature these days, healthy fats are a hot topic. The problem is that you’ll run into the quite a bit of conflicting information. The history is tortured. And unfortunately, even as science resolves some issues, others keep cropping up. For nearly 30 years, nutrition guidelines emphasized low-fat and low […]

The Way, the Truth, and the Perfect Diet

February 8, 2017 — Pew Research tells us that the public is becoming more spiritual at the same time that we are drifting away from organized religion. So people are seeking spirituality in other ways. Coming to terms with life and death has always been a focus of religion. And so it is that vaguely spiritual concepts of clean […]

Childhood Obesity Treatment Programs: A Few to Serve Many

February 7, 2017 — Approximately five million children and adolescents in the U.S. now suffer with severe obesity, and the prevalence is continuing to grow. To the best of our knowledge, fewer than 50 comprehensive childhood obesity treatment programs exist in the U.S. That’s one program for every 100,000 kids with severe obesity. Click the image on the left for a list […]

Growing Gaps in Pediatric Obesity Care

February 7, 2017 — As the prevalence of severe childhood obesity continues to grow, the gap in resources and guidelines for pediatric obesity care is reaching a crisis. In Clinical Obesity this month, Timothy Nissen and colleagues published an analysis of the evidence for current pediatric obesity guidelines. They found existing guidelines are out of date. The evidence supporting them is […]

Clean Eating, Dirty Reputation

February 3, 2017 — Clean eating, it seems, is earning a bit of a dirty reputation. This popular meme has grown out of the even more popular idea of healthy eating. Cambridge scientist Giles Yeo examined a range of clean eating fads for a BBC Horizons film. With the gentle persistence of a real scientist, Yeo takes apart inflated […]

Get Happy, Get Healthy, Get Moving

January 29, 2017 — A new study in PLoS One points once again to a simple way to get happy and get healthy. Find joy in an active life. Researchers from the University of Cambridge wrote a smartphone app. More than 10,000 people downloaded and used it to keep track of their moods and lifestyle choices. Accelerometers in the phones […]