Posts Tagged ‘health outcomes’

Evidence That Nutrition Facts Don’t Always Change Behavior

April 19, 2018 — Facts matter. Right? We like to think so. But the truth is that people act on emotion – beliefs and feelings – every bit as much as they do on facts. For a case study in how beliefs and feelings can triumph over facts, let’s take a look at a nutrition education program. Teaching Children About Gardens […]

Respecting Truth and Personal Autonomy in Obesity

April 18, 2018 — Step right up! Many people are handing out unsolicited advice about obesity and what’s best for you. This sort of advice comes from two dramatically different extremes. We hear it from ignorant, biased individuals who think that solutions are easy. But it also comes from people who say, forget it. Obesity is no big deal […]

Regulating the Appetite for Exercise

April 16, 2018 — Athleisure has taken over popular culture. It seems like everyone is working out. Runners are everywhere we turn. People move through their their days ready for yoga with their mats and togs. And yet, we’re also more sedentary than ever. How can this be? Could it be that our appetite for exercise plays a role? […]

Can You Outrun Bad Genes for Heart Disease?

April 10, 2018 — You can’t outrun a bad diet. So says the wisdom of the internet. But a new study published yesterday in Circulation suggests that maybe you can outrun bad genes for heart disease. Emmi Tikkanen and colleagues found that fitness, strength, and physical activity might erase some – but not all – of the risk for heart disease, […]

Flaws in Pushing the Idea of Harmless Obesity

April 6, 2018 — So much energy goes into amping up the “crisis” of obesity that an equal and opposite reaction is natural. Surely, can’t a person be fat and fit? Aren’t there certain situation where a bit of extra adiposity can actually help a person’s health? But a series of recent papers challenges two concepts of harmless obesity […]

What’s the Real Harm of Repeated Weight Cycling?

April 4, 2018 — The common presumption is that losing weight and then regaining it will slowly, but surely cost you in terms of health. Reading, writing, and responding to your thoughts yesterday about Cass Elliot provided a stark reminder of this. Elliot – just like many other people who live with obesity – could lose large amounts of weight […]

The Elusive Magic of Small Plates

March 29, 2018 — Do Smaller Plates Make You Eat Less? You may have seen Channel 4’s Food Unwrapped. The programme covers two topics of interest to me; portion sizes and plate sizes. Portion Distortion There is evidence that portion sizes of commercially provided foods have increased over time and the programme covered this story. One of the main reasons […]

Denying Care to Teens with Severe Obesity

March 20, 2018 — Two bits of recent research add to our concern about care denied to teens with severe obesity. One study compares bariatric surgery to intensive medical care. Teens with type 2 diabetes and severe obesity had much better outcomes with bariatric surgery. But another shows that very few teens (0.7%) with severe obesity actually receive the […]

Mindless Hype for the MIND Diet

March 17, 2018 — Here’s a diet that has everything. It actually provides for a pretty good quality of nutrition. It has a buzzy acronym – MIND – that suggests a compelling and very specific benefit. And it has the American Heart Association (among others) hyping it. The MIND diet has a lot going for it. Except for one thing. The […]

When One Size Fits All, Truth Suffers

March 5, 2018 — “You should be ashamed.” That message flies in every direction when the subject is weight and health and obesity. Shame is a potent tool, but it’s a sloppy one. And for health, it’s never helpful. Truth suffers when people start thinking they have an exclusive claim on the truth. And on weight, health, and obesity, one […]