Posts Tagged ‘health outcomes’

Picking Your Poison: Bias in Public Policy for Obesity

April 24, 2017 — How much evidence is necessary for enacting sound public policy for obesity? Yesterday at EB2017, the Obesity Research Interest Section of ASN brought together diverging views on that fundamental question. An economist and a public health professor warned about two different biases. Either of them can poison policies intended to improve public health. Bias for Action Professor […]

Magic Technology Cures for Diabetes and Obesity

April 18, 2017 — When people are desperate, magical thinking abounds. Even at the New York Times. Right now, you can read about how Silicon Valley technology is going to “tackle weight loss and diabetes with video chats.” With the help of mock apple cobbler and veggie omelets, an accountant and her husband have lost 120 pounds and avoided taking insulin. […]

Is Sleep Becoming Fashionable?

April 17, 2017 — Now that physical activity has become a fashion statement, will sleep be next? Dubious claims about powerful achievers who can thrive without sleeping much are giving way to sleep as a status symbol. And of course, that opens the door to commerce. A $400 Billion Economic Burden – And an Opportunity The RAND Corporation estimates […]

Nordic Food Patterns Going Global for Health

April 16, 2017 — Admittedly, we’ve fed you many glowing words about the Mediterranean diet. So if you’re looking for something different, consider The Nordic Way. Like the Mediterranean diet, the Nordic diet is a satisfying way of eating, with deep roots in culture. And it has an impressive body of science to document health benefits. Arne Astrup, Jennie Brand-Miller, and […]

Diabetes Rising Relentlessly in Kids

April 14, 2017 — This week in the New England Journal of Medicine, a new report provides the clearest picture of diabetes trends in kids that we’ve ever had. It’s not a pretty picture. We see new cases of  diabetes rising relentlessly in kids. Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes cases are rising. Startling Trends in Black and Native […]

Learning When Childhood Obesity Prevention Fails

April 13, 2017 — What do you do when a study fails to show the outcome you expected? When a strategy doesn’t work? When a carefully planned childhood obesity prevention strategy has no effect? In Pediatrics this week, Julie Lumeng and colleagues faced that very outcome. They tested the effects of a program for kids in Head Start aimed […]

Disease Statistics: Competing for the Most Deaths

April 9, 2017 — Disease statistics rise to the top when describing the urgency to solve a critical health problem. How much suffering and death is this causing? A new study in PLOS ONE finds that the number of deaths caused by diabetes may be as much as four times higher than the numbers typically reported. Getting to Root Causes The […]

Biostatisticians Are Frustrating When Data Are Weak

April 2, 2017 — Biostatisticians can be very helpful when they save someone from an embarrassing mistake. They can be frustrating when a person has already made the mistake. The frustration scenario comes out loud and clear in a case that Retraction Watch investigated this week. Claiming Efficacy Without Proving It Back in February, ConscienHealth reported on the mysterious […]

Escaping from the Tyranny of Body Mass Index

March 28, 2017 — Is Body Mass Index (BMI) dead? That depends on how you’ve been using it. If you’ve been using it to define obesity, then maybe it will soon be dead to you. Today in Obesity, a new commentary and an editorial both call for an end to BMI as the hard and fast definition of obesity. A Better […]

Throw Open a Window to Prevent Obesity and Diabetes?

March 27, 2017 — “Open your bedroom window at night to prevent obesity and type 2 diabetes.” The Telegraph reports this simple solution from an Oxford endocrinology professor. In a similar vein, the Guardian says “access to nature reduces depression and obesity.” That promise comes from a report of the Institute for European Environmental Policy. Cool Night Air Professor Asheley Grossman […]