Posts Tagged ‘health outcomes’

Woulda, Coulda, Shoulda Prevented Obesity

May 6, 2017 — Why haven’t we prevented obesity yet? Over and over again, we hear the rallying cry. In the Huffington Post, we read that we’ve got to continue focusing on nutrition and physical activity to make further progress controlling obesity. But with obesity rates at an all time high – 38% of American Adults – exactly how much obesity are […]

Yo-Yo Dieting: A Seductive Mix of Myth and Reality

May 4, 2017 — Yo-yo dieting is an boogeyman that persists stubbornly in defiance of the facts. A recent study published in the New England Journal of Medicine is the latest fuel for a mix of derision and fear mongering. Researchers found an association between weight fluctuations and bad outcomes from heart disease. They did not study dieting or […]

Alternate Day Fasting Hype Should Be Fading Fast

May 3, 2017 — As a spiritual practice, fasting has deep roots in many religions. But when spiritual practices try to make the leap into health practices, look out. For a prime example, it now looks like the hype about the alternate day miracle fast should be fading fast. A new randomized, controlled study published in JAMA Internal Medicine finds no benefit […]

Health Claims Handy for Confusing Consumers

April 30, 2017 — What does it mean when a food label says the product is healthy? For the last six months, more than a thousand public comments have poured into FDA. Two answers rise to the top. Health claims on a food label seem to be good for a bump in sales and for confusing consumers. Peculiar Advice […]

Picking Your Poison: Bias in Public Policy for Obesity

April 24, 2017 — How much evidence is necessary for enacting sound public policy for obesity? Yesterday at EB2017, the Obesity Research Interest Section of ASN brought together diverging views on that fundamental question. An economist and a public health professor warned about two different biases. Either of them can poison policies intended to improve public health. Bias for Action Professor […]

Magic Technology Cures for Diabetes and Obesity

April 18, 2017 — When people are desperate, magical thinking abounds. Even at the New York Times. Right now, you can read about how Silicon Valley technology is going to “tackle weight loss and diabetes with video chats.” With the help of mock apple cobbler and veggie omelets, an accountant and her husband have lost 120 pounds and avoided taking insulin. […]

Is Sleep Becoming Fashionable?

April 17, 2017 — Now that physical activity has become a fashion statement, will sleep be next? Dubious claims about powerful achievers who can thrive without sleeping much are giving way to sleep as a status symbol. And of course, that opens the door to commerce. A $400 Billion Economic Burden – And an Opportunity The RAND Corporation estimates […]

Nordic Food Patterns Going Global for Health

April 16, 2017 — Admittedly, we’ve fed you many glowing words about the Mediterranean diet. So if you’re looking for something different, consider The Nordic Way. Like the Mediterranean diet, the Nordic diet is a satisfying way of eating, with deep roots in culture. And it has an impressive body of science to document health benefits. Arne Astrup, Jennie Brand-Miller, and […]

Diabetes Rising Relentlessly in Kids

April 14, 2017 — This week in the New England Journal of Medicine, a new report provides the clearest picture of diabetes trends in kids that we’ve ever had. It’s not a pretty picture. We see new cases of  diabetes rising relentlessly in kids. Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes cases are rising. Startling Trends in Black and Native […]

Learning When Childhood Obesity Prevention Fails

April 13, 2017 — What do you do when a study fails to show the outcome you expected? When a strategy doesn’t work? When a carefully planned childhood obesity prevention strategy has no effect? In Pediatrics this week, Julie Lumeng and colleagues faced that very outcome. They tested the effects of a program for kids in Head Start aimed […]