Posts Tagged ‘health outcomes’

Penalties for Health and Genetic Privacy at Work

March 12, 2017 — All is not well in certain parts of the wellness industry. Employers are shying away from intrusive and coercive wellness programs that employees resent. So the wellness industry is looking for a bigger stick. They’re quietly pushing a bill that would make it easier to levy big penalties on employees who don’t want their employers […]

Drink More Water, Lose More Weight?

March 11, 2017 — Drink more water, Michelle Obama told us in the Let’s Move! campaign. She wasn’t the first with that advice. It’s everywhere. The presumption is that water can substitute for sweetened beverages, fill you up, and help you lose or maintain a lower weight. Thankfully, Julia Wong and colleagues from Boston Children’s Hospital tested that advice. […]

Gluten-Free Fad Diets Might Have a Diabetes Downside

March 10, 2017 — For millions of people who don’t really need a gluten-free diet, eating less gluten might actually have a downside. Research presented at the AHA Epi|Lifestyle meeting yesterday found that people who ate less gluten had a slightly higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The investigators found no difference in the risk of weight gain. […]

Too Much Sugar and Too Few Nuts?

March 9, 2017 — Too much sugar and too few nuts are killing us, apparently. That’s how press reports distilled a recent paper in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). On the other side of the globe, the messaging is similar. “Obesity has got us by our flabby throats,” says Peter FitzSimons in the Sydney Morning Herald. He […]

Health Insurance for Obesity After the ACA

March 8, 2017 — Will health insurance for obesity change under the new Republican plan to replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA) with the American Health Care Act (AHCA)? The short answer is maybe and maybe not. Some of the Basics The new plan repeals the mandate for everyone to buy insurance or face a penalty. Instead, people will […]

The “Common Sense Cure” for Childhood Obesity

March 5, 2017 — Will common sense cure childhood obesity? A new study in Pediatrics is humbling. The seemingly preventable problem of childhood obesity is defying our best efforts. Barry Taylor and colleagues conducted a randomized controlled trial of obesity prevention in the first two years of life. They carefully designed a program to target sleep, food, and physical activity. They found […]

Maybe Sitting Isn’t Really the New Smoking

March 2, 2017 — The idea that sitting is the new smoking has taken off. This compelling narrative – that your desk chair is killing you – is so titillating that you’ll find 33 million results on Google. We have an ample supply of infographics, books, TED Talks, and more. Just one tiny problem is cropping up: hyperbole. Reviewing the Evidence […]

Fasting Cures Diabetes? Not Exactly

February 28, 2017 — Have you seen the headlines this week about research that proves fasting can cure diabetes? Basic science research is building a wealth of knowledge about obesity and the metabolic dysfunction that results. Research in animals is providing invaluable clues for treating this disease. But let’s face it. Reporting on this research is sometimes abysmal. The […]

Making Peace with Bariatric Surgery for Teens

February 26, 2017 — The medical benefits of bariatric surgery for teens with severe obesity has become increasingly clear as trials such as the Teen-LABS study are providing more data on long-term outcomes. In Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology this month, two more studies (here and here) provide evidence for long-term benefits. Subjective Resistance But the more difficult hurdle is […]

Liraglutide for Obesity Looking Like Diabetes Prevention

February 23, 2017 — An impressive new three-year study of 3 mg liraglutide for obesity (Saxenda) finds that this therapy provides a large reduction in the risk of developing diabetes in people who have prediabetes. Published yesterday in Lancet, investigators found an 80% reduction in the risk of progressing to diabetes. In a post-hoc analysis, they made further assumptions […]