Posts Tagged ‘health outcomes’

Surgery, Suffering, and Money in Obesity and Diabetes

July 20, 2017 — Does gastric bypass surgery save money for patients with obesity and diabetes? That’s the question a new study answers in Obesity this week. Suffering with a chronic disease – at least in the short term – is usually free. So finding savings would indeed be surprising in a two-year study such as this one. This study holds […]

Hurtling Toward 100 Million Americans with Diabetes

July 19, 2017 — America is heading at a breakneck pace toward an awesome milestone – 100 million Americans with diabetes. According to a new CDC report, 30 million have it already. Another 84 million are well on their way. They have prediabetes – elevated blood sugar that makes it very likely for a person to develop full-blown type 2 diabetes. […]

Fitness Trackers Are Dead, Long Live Digital Health

July 18, 2017 — Anyone remember the Apple Newton? Or the Palm Pilot? Maybe you were once addicted to a Blackberry – also known as the crackberry because people just couldn’t put them down. Well, it looks like Fitbit might be on its way to technology oblivion – just like all three of those once hot personal tech innovations. Does […]

The Hype and Hope of Personalized Nutrition

July 18, 2017 — At YWM2017 yesterday, Christopher Gardner took a hard look at the hype and hopes for personalized nutrition. It’s an area of intense scientific interest. But a lot of sciency-sounding personalized nutrition advice is more sizzle than substance, as Gardner explained. If someone wants to sell you high-priced genetic testing to reveal the perfect diet for […]

Will Improving Your Diet a Little Bit Make You Live Longer?

July 14, 2017 — The New England Journal of Medicine has an interesting new study on the association between diet quality and the risk of death. So inevitably, it’s time for the headlines to give us all a pep talk about how a healthier diet will make us all live longer. “Even Modest Changes to Diet Can Reduce the […]

Rich and Poor in Opportunities to Walk

July 13, 2017 — Here’s a fascinating new way to look at health disparities. How much disparity does a place have in walking? Does everyone take many steps per day? Or do some take a lot while others take very few? A new study in Nature finds that disparities in opportunities to walk predict higher obesity rates.  Big Data […]

The Healthy Halo of Coffee Is Glowing Brighter

July 12, 2017 — Coffee just traded up to a brighter halo of health. In Annals of Internal Medicine yesterday, two studies found an association between drinking the brew and living a little bit longer. Should everyone drink deeply of this “elixir”? Our advice? Drink it if you like it. A Modest Benefit These two studies cover diverse populations. […]

Spinning for a Noble Purpose Defeats the Purpose

July 10, 2017 — “We know what to do to reduce obesity,” says public health professor Simon Chapman. It’s a common sentiment. But data don’t always line up with that sentiment. When that happens, spinning the data – putting negative results in a positive light – becomes tempting. The PR team at the Harvard Chan School of Public Health provides […]

Have People Stopped Worrying About Obesity?

July 7, 2017 — Today’s question crops up in many ways. We see research papers expressing fear that obesity is “becoming the new normal” or that parents are insufficiently concerned about their children’s weight. In this weight and fitness obsessed culture is it possible that people are not worrying enough about obesity? Fewer People Trying to Lose Weight Both […]

Hot Dogs and Apple Pie: All American Toxic Food?

July 4, 2017 — On this most American of holidays, perhaps we should reflect upon two icons of the American food environment: hot dogs and apple pie. Do these represent wholesome American nourishment with cherished histories? Or are they fixtures in a toxic food environment, loaded with processed meat and added sugar? The American Hot Dog Frankfurters date to […]