Posts Tagged ‘neuroscience’

Looking for the Best Exercise for Brain Health?

December 11, 2018 — High intensity interval training (HIIT) just got another boost in the scientific literature. A new study in Experimental Biology and Medicine tells us that HIIT might be especially helpful for brain health in people with obesity. Small Study, Surrogate Endpoint This is a fascinating study. Researchers evaluated the effect of HIIT and more moderate exercise […]

Food Addiction: Science and Storytelling at OW2018

November 13, 2018 — Never let the facts get in the way of a good story. Mark Twain understood this bit of wisdom. Thus we felt his influence at a session yesterday on food addiction at ObesityWeek 2018 in Nashville. Sandwiched between three scientists, we enjoyed an engaging presentation by a journalist with a good story to tell. It’s […]

Dunkin’ Thinkin’ in the News

September 27, 2018 — Honors for the best nutrition news fable of the week goes to Fox News. That’s because intrepid reporter Meredith Lepore made magic from a dense review article on energy requirements for cognitive work. From that humble starting material, she conjured up some great clickbait. Don’t think twice about grabbing an extra donut, she says. So […]

The Pleasure of M&Ms and Monet

April 14, 2018 — Is there any objective difference between the pleasure we feel in viewing Monet’s paintings or eating M&Ms? Perhaps this seems like an odd question. But it’s the subject of intense scientific controversy. And it’s relevant to our thinking about food. Hungry for Pleasure Julia Christensen started this scientific scuffle last year by publishing a provocative […]

Freeze a Nerve for Weight Loss? Not So Fast!

March 25, 2018 — Here’s a bit of hype that crossed many screens this week. The Society of Interventional Radiology wants you to know that an experimental procedure to freeze a nerve may “ignite weight loss.” Ignite sounds good, right? Naturally, health reporters had fun hyping this one. Our favorite: “Freezing the ‘hunger nerve’ could be key to more […]

Serotonin and Obesity: It’s Not Just in Your Head

March 24, 2018 — Maybe it’s not on the tip of every tongue. But serotonin is a bit more familiar than most neurotransmitters. Most people think of it as a “happy hormone” for the central nervous system that becomes depleted in a state of depression. However, The GI system has far more of it than the CNS. And now, […]

Are Women More Sensitive to the Pleasure of Food?

January 27, 2018 — We eat for many reasons, and one of those reasons is pleasure. Beautiful, appetizing food beckons us, even when we’re not physically hungry. Researchers label those qualities of food as hedonics. Food marketers know that these are the qualities that sell their products. And now, neuroscience suggests that women may be more sensitive than men […]

The Indestructible Myth of the Sugar High

November 19, 2017 — The Huffington Post asks if African Americans are “On a Sugar High?” That’s how they open a story about rising rates of diabetes. Health reporters offer advice for coming down from a sugar high. Tax cuts “Could Cause a Sugar High,” says Reuters. Oh, great! This buzz phrase connecting sugar, euphoria, and hyperactivity is so potent […]

Does a Gastric Sleeve Affect Teen Brain Function?

November 1, 2017 — At ObesityWeek, the Obesity Journal Symposium is always a good bet and yesterday was no exception. Among five excellent papers, one was especially intriguing – a study of how a gastric sleeve affects teen brain function. It was a small, but careful study with tantalizing results. Alaina Pearce and colleagues studied 36 patients in one active […]

I’ll Have a Handful of Magic Weight Loss Walnuts, Please

August 24, 2017 — Women’s Health summed up a bunch of sensational headlines recently: “Eating this one food might be the trick to losing weight.” That one food, of course, is magic walnuts. And the headlines flowed from some perfectly valid research. There’s just one tiny problem. Weight loss was not the subject of the research. In fact, the […]