Posts Tagged ‘neuroscience’

Lighting Up the Brain to Make It Behave

August 30, 2016 — Pop neuroscience has an astounding assortment of people offering up observations about lighting up the brain when people see appealing food – or any other stimulus that makes their point. But connecting those dots to some real scientific insight comes a little more slowly. A new publication in Appetite does an excellent job of tying together some […]

Food Addiction: Helpful, Hurtful, or Just Off the Mark?

August 27, 2016 — The popular interest in food addiction is impossible to miss. A search for scholarly articles on the subject yields thousands of references in 2016 alone. A check for news items produces hundreds of thousands. Amazon will serve you more than seven thousand books on the subject. So Nicole Avena and Nina Crowley met with an […]

Retrain the Brain to Treat Obesity?

July 27, 2016 — A body of fascinating research is coming together to suggest that it might be possible to retrain the brain and alter its response to food cues in a way that provides meaningful reductions in obesity. The promise lies with interventions that use insights about brain responses to food and inhibit the brain activity that contributes […]

Brain Activity in Obesity and Obesity Treatment

July 12, 2016 — Two fascinating new studies in the journal Diabetes provide new evidence for the importance of brain activity in obesity and its treatment. The first study documents significant differences in brain response to drinking sugar between adolescents who have obesity and adolescents who have a lean BMI. The second demonstrates how a new obesity treatment – lorcaserin – alters […]

Sugar, Dopamine, and Obesity

June 20, 2016 — New research from Washington University has identified an abnormal dopamine response to sugar in the brains of people with obesity as they age. Lead author of the study, Marta Pepino, explained: We believe we may have identified a new abnormality in the relationship between reward response to food and dopamine in the brains of individuals with […]

Calming the Brain’s Response to Food

April 4, 2016 — Your brain’s response to food is one of the key tools that your body uses to protect you from starving or losing too much weight. Even bad food starts looking really good and thoughts about food crowd out everything else in the brain. In a featured presentation at ENDO 2016, Olivia Farr and colleagues demonstrated that […]

Obesity Brain Wreck? Cut It Out!

March 1, 2016 — Some appalling health news headlines have lately been coming from a study of the relationship between memory and weight status. In the Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, Lucy Cheke and colleagues published a study of memory performance in people with BMIs ranging from 18 to 51. They found that higher BMI was associated with lower performance […]

Brains Respond Differently to Food in Obesity

February 22, 2016 — In the two leading obesity research journals this week, we have new evidence for how differently the brain responds to food and meals when someone has obesity. In Obesity, Nancy Puzziferri and colleagues documented a reduced neural response to eating in people with obesity. And then, Anja Dietrich and colleagues showed how the brain’s regulation of […]

Top 10 Foods for a Snowstorm

January 24, 2016 — Who are they kidding? Every time a snowstorm is looming, reporters trot out clichéd stories about everybody stocking up on milk, bread, and eggs. Not only is it unoriginal, we’re here to tell you it’s not true. Soup and pizza are the top foods to stock for a snowstorm, not milk and bread. Comfort is the theme of […]

Resilience May Come from Listening to Your Body

January 16, 2016 — Some fascinating brain research just published in Biological Psychology provides evidence for the supposition that resilience to stress may result from how well you listen to your body. Lori Haase and colleagues studied individuals with different degrees of resilience to stress. They evaluated brain function during and after a stressful situation. Through functional MRIs, they […]