Posts Tagged ‘nutrition’

Puffery and Promise for Intermittent Fasting

October 22, 2018 — FNCE served up a little nutrition epistemology in Washington yesterday. How? John Trepanowski and Steve Anton explored the promise and the puffery of intermittent fasting. RDN Carolyn O’Neil moderated. They explained some solid science. But they exposed some appalling hype. What do we really know to be true? Versus what is mere speculation or opinion. […]

Amylase: Another Clue for Precision Nutrition?

October 19, 2018 — New research from the University of Sydney is offering another clue for developing the science of personalized nutrition. Starch is the most common carbohydrate in our diets. And we have an enzyme in our saliva – amylase – that helps us start digesting starch even before we eat it. But different people will have very different responses […]

Obesity Is Getting Worse, Let’s Stay the Course

October 18, 2018 — The more things change, the more they stay the same. French writer Jean-Baptiste Alphonse Karr coined that phrase in 1849. But we can thank the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Trust for America’s Health for keeping it current. They’ve issued the 2018 edition of their annual State of Obesity Report. Therein they tell us – at […]

Sleeping Like a Baby to Prevent Obesity

October 16, 2018 — Childhood obesity starts early. By the time infants become toddlers, about 14 percent have obesity. If you read about the priorities for preventing childhood obesity, you’ll find a lot about nutrition. Family activities, too. But sleeping is a mere footnote. This might be a serious mistake, if you go by what recent research says. The Importance […]

The Perfectly Natural Bias for a White Hat

October 15, 2018 — Never underestimate the power of rationalization. Because sounds good, very often, is good enough. Just ask folks selling “natural” foods and drinks. A good story about natural purity fetches premium prices. Also, you should look at new research on white hat bias. Even for researchers, it seems the ends can justify the means. It’s a […]

Dieting Doesn’t Work. So Who Cares What You Eat?

October 8, 2018 — Diet is a four letter word. People who hate the word like to point out that it starts with die. So it is that more or less everyone agrees dieting does not work for the long term. But this is where the confusion starts. Because sustainable changes to long-term patterns of diet can make a […]

Which Matters Most: Calories, Carbs, or Consumption Patterns?

October 4, 2018 — It’s a familiar debate. Is energy balance governed by physiology, thermodynamics, and calories? Or does dietary quality – perhaps an excess of refined carbs – tell you more? It’s possible that this tired debate is missing an important point. Recent research suggests that consumption patterns might be at least equally important. When you eat and […]

Thinking Through the Ethics of Meat

October 3, 2018 — The fairy tale farm evokes images of pigs rolling in muddy pig pens, cows grazing in green pastures, and hens happily sitting on eggs in wooden hen houses. While this may have been the scene in the 1890s, the reality today is not so pretty. Increasing demand, corporatisation of agriculture, and the expectation of low […]

Quoi?! More Burgers Than Baguettes in France?

October 2, 2018 — France has one of the lowest obesity rates in the world. But it’s growing and the French parliament knows why. Le Big Mac. Burgers outsold baguettes for the first time ever in 2017. Burgers are on the menus in 85 percent of French restaurants. They sold 1.5 billion of them last year. So naturally, when the parliament […]

Is Your Salad Habit Eco-Friendly?

October 1, 2018 — The government machine that will grind out 2020 dietary guidelines is already rumbling along. Thanks to an act of Congress, sustainability probably won’t be much of a factor. Nonetheless, consumers are already focused on this dimension. You can see it clearly in fast casual restaurant marketing. Trendy chains are fighting to persuade you that they […]