Posts Tagged ‘obesity causes’

Are People Catching Obesity from Friends and Neighbors?

January 26, 2018 — It’s an uncomfortable notion sparking intense interest. Are people catching obesity from others in their social networks? A new study in JAMA Pediatrics lends further credibility to this idea. But the big question remains a puzzle. Exactly how does that work? A Natural Experiment Ashlesha Datar and Nancy Nicosia used data from the Military Teenagers’ […]

Digging Deeply into the Personal Molecular Basis of Obesity

January 22, 2018 — One of the hottest concepts in obesity is precision medicine. That’s especially important because obesity is different in every person who experiences it. One person might respond beautifully to a given treatment. Then that same treatment will have disappointing effects in the next person. So it’s exciting to see new landmark research in Cell Systems that […]

OK, So What Should We Do About Obesity?

January 15, 2018 — It’s an obvious and fair question. Quite often, we describe serious flaws in current strategies to address obesity. If we’re going to find fault with current strategies, then what’s the alternative? What should we do about obesity? Here, we offer three priorities that would be at the top of the list if we ran the […]

Is Genetic Risk of Obesity Really So Hard to Grasp?

January 13, 2018 — C’mon Medscape. Genes are no excuse for obesity? Is that the best you can do with a fine study of obesity, diet, and genetic risk? Sadly, Medscape’s bias about obesity is showing. That’s because the website translated hope for overcoming obesity into a finger wagging headline about excuses. Highly Heritable, Poorly Understood Scientists have long […]

Puritanism Makes Faulty Health Policy

January 12, 2018 — The puritanism within us is alive and well, says Matthew Hutson. That much is clear from a new, white-hot debate published in the Annual Review of Public Health. That debate is all about nicotine. But our ongoing obsession with the perils of sugar echoes many of the same themes – along with some important differences. Nicotine: […]

Obesity Research as a Marketing Tool for 23andMe

January 8, 2018 — With much fanfare, 23andMe recently announced a massive study of the interaction between a person’s genetic profile and weight management. The company has recruited 100,000 customers with excess weight. The study will randomize those people to three different treatment strategies. One of the treatment groups will follow a low-carb diet. Another will cut animal fat and […]

Three Bad Assumptions About the Perfect Storm of Obesity

December 20, 2017 — Bad assumptions make bad policy. And at the heart of policies to address obesity for three decades has been a wobbly understanding of what exactly is causing the perfect storm of obesity. That storm continues to rage despite best efforts to prevent its impact on health around the world. Why, exactly, has the obesity’s prevalence grown […]

Serving Up More Shame in Children’s Movies

December 9, 2017 — Movies offer an escape from harsh realities, right? That’s the conventional wisdom to explain why we watch. But a new analysis published in the December issue of Pediatrics suggests that’s not entirely true. A child being bullied about body weight can be pretty sure that the most popular children’s movies will include fat shaming messages. […]

Parents’ Working Hours and Childhood Obesity

December 2, 2017 — Two recent analyses point to a relationship between the hours parents work and a child’s risk of obesity. A small correlation between parents working and childhood obesity risk is not especially new. What is new is a deeper look at the potential for a cause and effect relationship. Charles Courtemanche believes that he and his colleagues […]

Just How Toxic Is Screen Time?

November 25, 2017 — Jean Twenge and her colleagues have a pretty dire story to tell you. It’s all about the toxic effects of screen time on our youth: In just the five years between 2010 and 2015, the number of U.S. teens who felt useless and joyless – classic symptoms of depression – surged 33 percent in large […]