Posts Tagged ‘obesity causes’

Sluggishness: Maybe It’s the Missing Dopamine

January 3, 2017 — Drug addiction changes human brains. One of those changes is a depletion of dopamine receptors. In obesity, dopamine and its receptors may have a role, but many questions remain. And now, new animal research raises yet another question. Could it be that changes in dopamine receptors make physical activity more difficult in obesity? Danielle Friend […]

Work-Walk-Work Therapy

December 30, 2016 — We’ve heard the warnings. Sitting is killing us. So people are responding. Sales of standing desks are booming. Varidesk has grown from a wobbly startup to market leader in just three years. Walking desks might offer more benefits…at at a much higher cost. But research is pointing to a much simpler answer – work-walk-work therapy. It’s really […]

Finding a Healthy Space Between Solitude and Isolation

December 24, 2016 — A quiet plague grows acute at this time of year – social isolation. It can trigger a host of chronic health problems, including obesity. Writing in the New York Times, physician Dhruv Khullar explains: Social isolation is a growing epidemic — one that’s increasingly recognized as having dire physical, mental and emotional consequences. Since the 1980s, the […]

Facing the Truth of Genetic Obesity Risks

December 5, 2016 — A new study in Obesity debunks the notion that people can’t handle the truth of genetic obesity risks. Catharine Wang and colleagues conducted a randomized, controlled trial of telling people about their genetic and lifestyle risks for obesity. They found that: Those who received genetic risk alone had greater intentions [to lose weight] at follow-up, compared […]

Obesity Awareness: Public Service or Public Nuisance?

December 3, 2016 — New “public service” advertising from a Swedish foundation features the brilliant physicist and cosmologist Stephen Hawking. But the advertising is more public nuisance than public service. Its objective appears to be promoting obesity awareness. The message is tired and false: We eat too much and move too little. Fortunately, the solution is simple – more physical activity, a change in […]

Chasing the Genes That Shape Our Bodies

November 30, 2016 — Genes play a profound role in shaping our bodies, as does the environment into which we are born. To date, more than 80 genetic variations have been linked to BMI and body fat distribution. Atul Chopra and colleagues at Baylor College of medicine are studying a defect in the FBN1 gene that can have a profound […]

Weight Regain, Microbes, and Yo-Yo Reporting

November 25, 2016 — How does a mouse study about the role of gut microbes in weight regulation become a study of “yo-yo dieting?” The answer, unfortunately, is heavy-handed academic public relations and sloppy health reporting. The case in point is a perfectly good mouse study published yesterday in the journal Nature. The authors found evidence in mice that […]

 Let’s Move Past Simplistic Happy Talk on Childhood Obesity

November 20, 2016 — Commenters are churning out lots of commentary about elitists and populists these days. We would prefer a turn toward realists. And for a dose of reality about childhood obesity, voices from Appalachia might be worth hearing.  Amidst a lot of happy talk about obesity rates dropping in toddlers, West Virginia’s Parkersburg News and Sentinel has some […]

DNA, Destiny, Health, and Obesity

November 15, 2016 — Let’s face it. Americans don’t like the idea of accepting a preordained destiny. Nope, we’ll have none of that. We choose our own destiny here, thank you. So naturally, if the New England Journal of Medicine tells us that DNA is not destiny when it comes to our risk of heart attacks, we love it. […]

Liking, Craving, and Food Addiction

November 14, 2016 — Perhaps you’ve seen Ricky Ricardo bringing Lucy pickles and sardines to go with her milkshakes on that classic episode of I Love Lucy. That’s a memorable depiction of craving foods that you might not really like. A new study in Appetite tackles the subject in a slightly more scientific way. Sarah Polk and colleagues set out […]