Posts Tagged ‘obesity statistics’

Disease Statistics: Competing for the Most Deaths

April 9, 2017 — Disease statistics rise to the top when describing the urgency to solve a critical health problem. How much suffering and death is this causing? A new study in PLOS ONE finds that the number of deaths caused by diabetes may be as much as four times higher than the numbers typically reported. Getting to Root Causes The […]

Can We Stop Faking the Answers to Obesity?

January 21, 2017 — Let’s get something straight. We do not know the answers to obesity. This observation is neither bad nor good. It’s simply true. U.S. News offers a harsh assessment of progress against obesity during the Obama administration: Obesity increased overall despite an administration that made addressing it a priority. Progress against obesity has been limited, and rates […]

No, Childhood Obesity Is Not Plateauing

January 13, 2017 — People opine every day about childhood obesity. Some of the words inform and some inflame. But most disturbing is constant flow of wishful reports that childhood obesity is plateauing. In December, headlines flowed with “good news” about “fewer chubby babies.” The cause was a study published in Pediatrics that, according to its authors, “cannot be considered representative […]

U.S. Life Expectancy Down: Can We Blame Obesity?

December 9, 2016 — For the first time in more than 20 years, life expectancy dropped in the U.S. last year. New data from the CDC shows an increase in deaths from eight of its top ten causes. CDC Director Tom Frieden was blunt in his assessment: We’re seeing the ramifications of the increase in obesity. And we’re seeing that […]

CDC: Learning from a Shortfall on Obesity Goals

December 6, 2016 — When Tom Frieden took over CDC, obesity goals took center stage with six other “winnable battles” in public health. On smoking, teen pregnancy, healthcare infections, and HIV, progress was notable. Progress on obesity goals fell short. The same was true for motor vehicle injuries and food safety. Frieden was frank about the poor progress on […]

 Let’s Move Past Simplistic Happy Talk on Childhood Obesity

November 20, 2016 — Commenters are churning out lots of commentary about elitists and populists these days. We would prefer a turn toward realists. And for a dose of reality about childhood obesity, voices from Appalachia might be worth hearing.  Amidst a lot of happy talk about obesity rates dropping in toddlers, West Virginia’s Parkersburg News and Sentinel has some […]

The Elusive Price for Obesity

September 19, 2016 — Conversations about obesity almost inevitably come around to its costliness. Look for references on obesity costs and you’ll get a million results. But despite so much attention to economic analysis, putting a price on the diagnosis of obesity turns out to be quite a messy task. Even the relatively simpler matter of estimating direct medical costs […]

The Problem with Obesity Scorecards

September 6, 2016 — For many years, the Trust for America’s Health has been cranking out obesity scorecards. In concert with the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, they’ve just rolled out the 2016 edition of The State of Obesity. More a media tool than an objective analysis, this report generates an impressive volume of headlines: Do You Live in One […]

Soda Sales Down in Mexico – Now What?

August 1, 2016 — Authors of a new study published in PLOS ONE report that soda sales were down in Mexico for the first year after an 8% tax on soda and other junk foods went into effect. The decline was especially steep in households with low socioeconomic status (SES). Overall, households cut their consumption of junk foods and sugar-sweetened beverages by 5%. Low SES […]

Discipline Doesn’t Prevent Obesity in the Military

June 28, 2016 — We sometimes hear from people who should know better that obesity results from a failure of self-discipline. It’s a conviction that’s hard to shake. But a new study in Obesity finds a rising rate of obesity in one of the most highly disciplined populations in the world: the U.S. military. Clearly, discipline does not protect people […]