Posts Tagged ‘obesity treatment’

Making Peace with Bariatric Surgery for Teens

February 26, 2017 — The medical benefits of bariatric surgery for teens with severe obesity has become increasingly clear as trials such as the Teen-LABS study are providing more data on long-term outcomes. In Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology this month, two more studies (here and here) provide evidence for long-term benefits. Subjective Resistance But the more difficult hurdle is […]

Liraglutide for Obesity Looking Like Diabetes Prevention

February 23, 2017 — An impressive new three-year study of 3 mg liraglutide for obesity (Saxenda) finds that this therapy provides a large reduction in the risk of developing diabetes in people who have prediabetes. Published yesterday in Lancet, investigators found an 80% reduction in the risk of progressing to diabetes. In a post-hoc analysis, they made further assumptions […]

Is Obesity a Disease? Do the Math

February 21, 2017 — A good friend who struggled all his life with severe obesity once confided to us: “Obesity isn’t really a disease, is it? I mean, you can’t catch it.” But, if you stop to do the math, it turns out that you can. Math models of disease transmission show that obesity can indeed spread through social […]

Surgery: Six Times Better for Controlling Type 2 Diabetes

February 16, 2017 — Today in the New England Journal of Medicine, five-year results of a randomized, controlled trial show that bariatric surgery is six times better than intensive medical treatment for controlling type 2 diabetes. That’s right. Six times better chances for success after five years. Without surgery, the outcomes were dramatically worse. This study, known as the […]

Trash Talk About Causality, Personality, and Obesity

February 15, 2017 — Causality captivates people when the subject is obesity. The appetite for understanding factors that cause obesity grows more insatiable as its health and economic impact grows more devastating. That appetite surely spurred a new publication in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. Gulay Avsar and colleagues developed a random effects model to […]

Obesity Policies: Punishment, Care, or Neglect?

February 9, 2017 — We now have four decades of dramatic growth in obesity prevalence behind us. We have spent two of those decades bemoaning the problem and calling for urgent action. But obesity policies to date – however well-intended – have not even stopped the upward trend. Reversing the trend seems like a fantasy. Perhaps part of the problem is […]

Childhood Obesity Treatment Programs: A Few to Serve Many

February 7, 2017 — Approximately five million children and adolescents in the U.S. now suffer with severe obesity, and the prevalence is continuing to grow. To the best of our knowledge, fewer than 50 comprehensive childhood obesity treatment programs exist in the U.S. That’s one program for every 100,000 kids with severe obesity. Click the image on the left for a list […]

Growing Gaps in Pediatric Obesity Care

February 7, 2017 — As the prevalence of severe childhood obesity continues to grow, the gap in resources and guidelines for pediatric obesity care is reaching a crisis. In Clinical Obesity this month, Timothy Nissen and colleagues published an analysis of the evidence for current pediatric obesity guidelines. They found existing guidelines are out of date. The evidence supporting them is […]

Three Catchphrases for Gently Dismissing People with Obesity

February 1, 2017 — Solving a problem is tough when you’ve been dismissed. And routinely, in conversations about obesity, we hear the people with obesity dismissed. Here are three popular catchphrases for gently dismissing people with obesity. 1. We can’t treat our way out of the obesity epidemic. The false choice between treatment and prevention surfaces again and again. The […]

Apples and Oranges, Soda Taxes and Surgery

January 27, 2017 — Here’s an unusual comparison. It contrasts the value of two different options for childhood obesity: a tax on sugary beverages versus bariatric surgery for adolescents. Steven Gortmaker and colleagues published this analysis in Health Affairs. Gortmaker presented the data yesterday in Washington, DC. Calling this an apples and oranges comparison would be generous. The basis for this comparison has two dimensions. First […]