Posts Tagged ‘public health’

Serving Up More Shame in Children’s Movies

December 9, 2017 — Movies offer an escape from harsh realities, right? That’s the conventional wisdom to explain why we watch. But a new analysis published in the December issue of Pediatrics suggests that’s not entirely true. A child being bullied about body weight can be pretty sure that the most popular children’s movies will include fat shaming messages. […]

NEJM: Childhood Obesity Prevention Won’t Be Enough

November 30, 2017 — Facts are stubborn. And today, one of the stubborn facts of obesity is a bit more clear. Prevention alone is not enough. Late yesterday in the New England Journal of Medicine, some leading advocates for childhood obesity prevention wrote: A narrow focus solely on preventing childhood obesity will not avert potential future health damage that may be induced by […]

Name It, Shame It, Call It Out?

November 23, 2017 — We can’t ignore it. The Scarlet S – shame – is everywhere in the news. And it’s a coin with two sides. On one side of this coin, the Scarlet S is riding high. Women are shaming awful men who assaulted, abused, and harassed them. And everyone is hoping for a turning point toward a more just […]

A New Call for Putting Children First in Childhood Obesity

November 20, 2017 — A big gap just closed. At long last, we will be putting children first in childhood obesity. Until today, efforts to reduce the impact of childhood obesity have been mostly silent on the issue of shame and blame that children and families face with obesity. But today, the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Obesity Society […]

Animal Agriculture: Human Versus Planetary Health

November 17, 2017 — What if everyone became a vegan? No more animals in agriculture. In the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Robin White and Mary Beth Hall tried to answer that question. They modeled the impact of taking animals out of U.S. agricultural production – on nutrition and on the environment. What they found was a bit […]

Suddenly, Half the Population Has High Blood Pressure?

November 15, 2017 — In case you weren’t paying attention, 130 is the new 140. Before Monday, the threshold for high blood pressure was 140 over 90. Now the consensus is that it’s 130 over 80. Boom. Nearly half the population has hypertension. How’d that happen? The Landmark SPRINT Study Truthfully, this change didn’t happen overnight. The impetus to […]

How Bias and Discrimination Make Us Sick

November 13, 2017 — Bias and discrimination are ugly aspects of human nature. They come in many forms. Fat shaming, racism, and sexism are all very much in the news. Also in the news is the physical harm to our health from repeated, stressful experiences with discrimination. The stress of bias and discrimination is making us sick. The Stress […]

Digging Into the Real Benefits of Physical Activity

November 9, 2017 — Getting down to the facts about the health benefits of physical activity is harder than it should be. But three new studies this week and a new roadmap for change certainly set the stage. The popular myth is that working out is a great way to lose weight. But the truth is better than the […]

Does Sensational Blame for Obesity in Britain Matter?

November 8, 2017 — Is it a coincidence? Lately we’ve been seeing a lot of sensational headlines from the UK, loaded with blame for people living with obesity. Some parts of the NHS have adopted rules to deny surgery to people with obesity. Tabloids run headlines about “obese patients eating themselves to DEATH.” Examples of sensational blame directed at […]

The Simplicity of Obesity and the Magic of Nutrition

October 28, 2017 — Welcome to a world of magic. In this world, obesity is simple. One pound of fat is the result of eating 3,500 calories. In this magical kingdom, the exalted Mayo Clinic tells us: Your weight is a balancing act, but the equation is simple: If you eat more calories than you burn, you gain weight. […]