Posts Tagged ‘research’

Regressing to Prove a Point

December 10, 2017 — “Believe me” is a popular phrase lately. It flows freely from people working to prove a point. It works for someone with something to sell. But it doesn’t work well in scientific journals. Consider this case of a pilot weight intervention study for an older lesbian population. A Big Leap for Pilot Study The SHE […]

How Come Cinnabon Doesn’t Cure Obesity?

November 26, 2017 — Scanning the latest hyperbolic headlines on obesity research, we’re left with just one question. Does Cinnabon have a cure for obesity? It’s really quite amazing. The Tech Times tells us “Cinnamon Could be the Secret Ingredient to Weight Loss.” USA Today says “Cinnamon May Help Attack Fat, Fight Obesity.” So maybe all that Cinnabon smell […]

Can Obesity Drugs Match Surgery’s Effectiveness?

November 24, 2017 — Novo Nordisk is feeling bold. The company has long been a leader in diabetes care. But now, it aims to create obesity drugs that will match the effectiveness of bariatric surgery. CEO Lars Fruergaard Jorgensen told investors this week: We are making a bet on obesity, and we believe we can ride it based on lifting […]

Ten Reflections from ObesityWeek 2017

November 4, 2017 — ObesityWeek 2017 is finished. It’s been an intense week with some of the smartest people in the world, dealing with the subject of obesity. Most people don’t really want to think deeply about it. But these people devote their careers to it. So what can we take home. Here are ten ideas that floated to […]

Does a Gastric Sleeve Affect Teen Brain Function?

November 1, 2017 — At ObesityWeek, the Obesity Journal Symposium is always a good bet and yesterday was no exception. Among five excellent papers, one was especially intriguing – a study of how a gastric sleeve affects teen brain function. It was a small, but careful study with tantalizing results. Alaina Pearce and colleagues studied 36 patients in one active […]

Looking for a Model of Scientific Integrity?

October 29, 2017 — Stuff happens. Errors creep into research papers. We gripe about it here from time to time. But today we have a great example of how scientific integrity works. Back in July, a group of researchers, led by Yulyu Yeh, published a paper about nutrition education for African-American preschoolers. Their analysis found a benefit for the […]

Prevention That Sounds Too Good to Be True

October 24, 2017 — It’s an easy trap. Prevention is a cherished goal for childhood obesity. Behavioral economics has such a strong cachet that it just earned Richard Thaler a Nobel Prize. So when elegant research that says little nudges – like a sticker on a piece of fruit – can lead children to make better food choices, we want to […]

A New Protein with Promising Effect for Obesity

October 23, 2017 — It’s early days for this new protein, but worth noting, nonetheless. Amgen scientists have successfully demonstrated that they can modify a GDF15 protein to treat obesity in mice, rats, and primates. With animal data published in Science Translational Medicine, they show an impressive effect on body weight in mice and monkeys. Acting on the Gut […]

Circadian Rhythms: A Nobel Prize and Obesity Insights

October 3, 2017 — This year’s Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine is here. For their work on the genetic basis of circadian rhythms, Jeffrey Hall, Michael Rosbash, and Michael Young are sharing the prize. They discovered a gene in fruit flies that helps explain the mechanism for just about every living thing to adapt to the rhythms of […]

Fine-Tuning for the Stomach to Treat Obesity

September 27, 2017 — Could it be that a little fine-tuning for the stomach can have a real effect on obesity? That’s the gist of the latest research on how liraglutide (Saxenda) works. The senior author on this study, Michael Camilleri, explains: Liraglutide appears to be very effective in inducing weight loss over three months of treatment. We also […]