Posts Tagged ‘research’

Circadian Rhythms: A Nobel Prize and Obesity Insights

October 3, 2017 — This year’s Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine is here. For their work on the genetic basis of circadian rhythms, Jeffrey Hall, Michael Rosbash, and Michael Young are sharing the prize. They discovered a gene in fruit flies that helps explain the mechanism for just about every living thing to adapt to the rhythms of […]

Fine-Tuning for the Stomach to Treat Obesity

September 27, 2017 — Could it be that a little fine-tuning for the stomach can have a real effect on obesity? That’s the gist of the latest research on how liraglutide (Saxenda) works. The senior author on this study, Michael Camilleri, explains: Liraglutide appears to be very effective in inducing weight loss over three months of treatment. We also […]

The Potential for Exercise to Prevent 1 in 12 Early Deaths

September 22, 2017 — Yet again, we have the PURE study this week stirring up headlines around the world. A couple of weeks ago, it was nutrition. Today in Lancet, they’re publishing data on the potential for exercise to prevent deaths. Scott Lear and colleagues say that 30 minutes of exercise, five days a week can make a big […]

Searching for Bias? Look in the Mirror

September 18, 2017 — “We need a safe space to rethink our assumptions.” This phrase came from a recent summary panel on food environments and obesity prevention. Later, the speaker explained. We need that safe space, she said, because a disproven assumption puts funding at risk. So people are reluctant to speak candidly. It was a stark reminder. The […]

The Miraculous Keto Diet – For Lab Mice

September 10, 2017 — Sprinkled through the the health news this week, the miraculous keto diet was offering up some wonderful benefits. A longer life, greater strength, and better memory can all be yours – if you’re a lab mouse. Cell Metabolism published two studies in mice and unleashed a torrent of frothy health reporting. Arcane Nutrition Science Meets […]

Head Spinning Bias About Funding Bias

September 8, 2017 — “Don’t trust research funded by industry.” Suspicion runs deep about commercial funding for research, especially in nutrition. So, we imagine many heads were nodding recently when Justin Rankin and colleagues reported a signal of funding bias in obesity studies. Consistent with prevailing beliefs, their report suggested that industry-funded studies were the most likely to selectively report […]

Are Pediatricians Hooked on BMI Scores for Kids?

September 6, 2017 — When it comes to BMI, everyone is a hater. Even so, most people are content to keep using it as an easy number to screen adults for obesity. But for kids, everyone knows BMI just doesn’t work. In Pediatrics this month, Bill Dietz  describes “widespread agreement” that BMI scores for kids with severe obesity are […]

Nutrition Neophilia Scrambles the Picture

September 2, 2017 — We have breaking news from Barcelona! Headlines from the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Congress this week tell us: “Everything the government teaches us about eating is wrong.” Normally sober and cautious, Stat tells us: “Huge new study casts doubt on conventional wisdom about fat and carbs.” But you needn’t be alarmed. This is just […]

Can Health Policies Prevent Weight Gain in Young Adults?

August 3, 2017 — We have a new target, folks. For decades now, the preferred cause has been to prevent childhood obesity. Stitch in time. Ounces of prevention. Innocent children. All that fuzzy imagery was easier for people to buy into than addressing obesity in grownups. Writing in JAMA, Bill Dietz calls for expanding that focus to prevent weight […]

Fudging Conclusions About Childhood Obesity Prevention

August 2, 2017 — “We have a pretty good idea of how to curb childhood obesity.” Such convictions run deep. And because of those convictions, prevention is a frontline strategy for dealing with childhood obesity. So it’s especially dispiriting when we see the scientific literature stained by a paper fudging conclusions about childhood obesity prevention. No Significant Effect Morphs […]