Posts Tagged ‘research’

Progress on the Next Generation of Obesity Treatment

March 21, 2017 — Gratefully, we can report progress on the next generation of obesity treatment. For starters, John Blundell and colleagues have just published a controlled clinical trial of semaglutide in obesity. The study is a tightly controlled experiment to explain how the drug works. And beyond semaglutide, more options for treating obesity are moving into development. The […]

Maybe Sitting Isn’t Really the New Smoking

March 2, 2017 — The idea that sitting is the new smoking has taken off. This compelling narrative – that your desk chair is killing you – is so titillating that you’ll find 33 million results on Google. We have an ample supply of infographics, books, TED Talks, and more. Just one tiny problem is cropping up: hyperbole. Reviewing the Evidence […]

Stress in Your Hair with a Link to Obesity?

March 1, 2017 — Plenty of people feel stressed about their hair. But who knew that traces of stress in your hair are measurable. Well, a novel study published this month in Obesity suggests that scientists can do just that. Sarah Jackson and colleagues measured cortisol concentration in hair samples from 2,527 British men and women over four years. And they […]

George Blackburn: Father of Obesity and Nutrition Medicine

February 22, 2017 — We feel the world diminished by the loss of a very fine man this week. George Blackburn, MD, PhD, died on Tuesday at his home in Boston. President-elect Caroline Apovian of the Obesity Society explains: My friend and mentor George Blackburn was truly the father of nutrition and obesity medicine. He is someone who supported […]

Is Obesity a Disease? Do the Math

February 21, 2017 — A good friend who struggled all his life with severe obesity once confided to us: “Obesity isn’t really a disease, is it? I mean, you can’t catch it.” But, if you stop to do the math, it turns out that you can. Math models of disease transmission show that obesity can indeed spread through social […]

Different Foods Spark Different Parts of Your Brain

February 18, 2017 — It’s a complex puzzle. But your brain definitely responds in very complex ways when you spot some food. Food marketers know this at a practical level. They spend their lives figuring out ways to make you respond to images of their products. Neuroscientists are figuring it out at a more basic level. Functional MRI images […]

Trash Talk About Causality, Personality, and Obesity

February 15, 2017 — Causality captivates people when the subject is obesity. The appetite for understanding factors that cause obesity grows more insatiable as its health and economic impact grows more devastating. That appetite surely spurred a new publication in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. Gulay Avsar and colleagues developed a random effects model to […]

Ready to Move Past Little Fibs in Eating Patterns

February 11, 2017 — Little fibs are among the biggest challenges in nutrition research. These little fibs show up in food diaries – self-reports of what a person in a nutrition study has eaten. People misremember, they fudge, or they might write down what they wish they had eaten. Mostly, people try to be honest, but little fibs add up […]

Obesity Policies: Punishment, Care, or Neglect?

February 9, 2017 — We now have four decades of dramatic growth in obesity prevalence behind us. We have spent two of those decades bemoaning the problem and calling for urgent action. But obesity policies to date – however well-intended – have not even stopped the upward trend. Reversing the trend seems like a fantasy. Perhaps part of the problem is […]

Growing Gaps in Pediatric Obesity Care

February 7, 2017 — As the prevalence of severe childhood obesity continues to grow, the gap in resources and guidelines for pediatric obesity care is reaching a crisis. In Clinical Obesity this month, Timothy Nissen and colleagues published an analysis of the evidence for current pediatric obesity guidelines. They found existing guidelines are out of date. The evidence supporting them is […]