Archive for the ‘Scientific Meetings & Publications’ Category

Do We Value the Food That Sustains Us?

January 22, 2020 — Spending five days with some of the most influential nutrition communication professionals in America has made us think. Do we value the food that sustains us? Is the low cost of food in America entirely a good thing? Why, despite that low cost, do we still have so much food insecurity? Cheap Calories Make no […]

Will Skim Milk Save You from Aging?

January 20, 2020 — Skim milk can be whatever you want. To some people (we confess) it seems like a disgusting example of fake food. To others it’s an exemplar for healthy nutrition. For that latter crowd, a new study points to an association of slower aging with drinking skim or low-fat milk. Is this a benefit you can […]

Menu Manifestos Making Massive Meat Mayhem

January 18, 2020 — Meat mayhem marches on in the arcane world of academic nutrition warfare. Humans have a tough time these days with diversity of thinking. Especially if the subject is nutrition. Or food policy. Thus, Rita Rubin served up a compelling account of the ongoing battles about meat in JAMA this week. Avoiding the Meat of the […]

What Happens When Providers Judge Patients?

January 17, 2020 — Trust and vulnerability are two closely related dimensions of the relationship between healthcare providers and patients. Trust arises from vulnerability, wrote Mark Hall. But when providers judge patients, they violate that trust. New research in JAMA Network Open tells us that this breach of trust might be relatively common. And it has serious consequences. That’s […]

Low Carb or Slow Carbs? Fiber Matters

January 14, 2020 — In the midst of popular frenzy about low carb diets, substantial evidence suggests a shift in focus to us. Research is suggesting that slow carbs might be a very good option. Soluble fiber slows the digestion of carbohydrates. It gives food a lower glycemic index, meaning that it produces less of a spike in blood […]

Artificial Sweeteners: Too Much Sweetness and Light?

January 13, 2020 — Is there such a thing as too much sweetness and light? This is a question that bugs people who just don’t trust artificial sweeteners. Thus, a new study in Nutrients will add fuel to their fires of suspicion. Researchers led by Alexander Nichol conducted a small, randomized crossover study of sucralose (Splenda®) and its effect […]

Sleep Apnea: Do We Need Leaner Tongues?

January 12, 2020 — Sleep apnea is a serious problem with serious consequences for life and health. With this condition, people have shorter lives and more cardiovascular disease. Because obesity is the primary risk factor for sleep apnea, it’s growing just as obesity is. That’s why we’re hearing so many ads for CPAP machines and supplies. More and more […]

A Steep Price to Pay for Untreated NASH

January 11, 2020 — A new study in the January issue of Diabetes Care makes one thing very clear. We pay a steep price for untreated NASH – nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. This is a disease that starts with fat tissue building up in the liver. Then inflammation develops. After that, it can progress to liver damage and failure, ultimately requiring […]

Toward a More Definitive Diagnosis of Obesity

January 10, 2020 — One of the few things in obesity that people agree upon is that BMI has serious limitations for the diagnosis of obesity. It’s great for epidemiologists. But it causes problems for clinicians and patients. While it’s useful as a crude measure of weight status, it doesn’t provide much insight into a patient’s clinical status. So […]

Heritability, Inevitability, and Risk for Obesity

January 9, 2020 — We ought to be the masters of our own fate. Pull ourselves up by the bootstraps. Get up and do what needs to be done. And you know what? Most people do their best. However, this little inspirational talk is no substitute for medical facts. And the fact is that obesity is a highly heritable, […]