Posts Tagged ‘behavioral economics’

A Little Nudge to Treat Childhood Obesity

February 24, 2020 — Bless their hearts. Really. We know they mean well. Three health policy gurus have a new viewpoint in JAMA Pediatrics on childhood obesity treatment. They explain “how children and families make daily obesity-related decisions.” Because they’re “not rational.” So you have to “keep it simple” for them. Thus, behavioral economics can provide a wonderful little […]

Nudges: A Thousand Tiny Band-Aids for a Thousand Tiny Cuts

September 8, 2018 — Using a small spoon might be a useful tool for preventing weight gain and obesity. That’s the claim you’ll find at the end of a new study in the British Journal of Nutrition. Like many other little nudges, smaller spoons seem to have have an impact on eating behaviors. But like the metaphor of a […]

Prevention That Sounds Too Good to Be True

October 24, 2017 — It’s an easy trap. Prevention is a cherished goal for childhood obesity. Behavioral economics has such a strong cachet that it just earned Richard Thaler a Nobel Prize. So when elegant research that says little nudges – like a sticker on a piece of fruit – can lead children to make better food choices, we want to […]

Another Nobel Prize That Reflects on Obesity

October 10, 2017 — Last week it was the biological clocks that rule our metabolism. This week it’s the economics of little nudges in everyday choices – like what to eat. For bringing economic and behavioral sciences together, Richard Thaler has won the Nobel Prize in economics. Thaler explained how people make decisions that do not always seem rational. He […]

Good Results in Small Packages

September 21, 2015 — Small packages can yield big results for changing food consumption. That’s the word from a new, exhaustive evidence review published by the highly respected Cochrane Collaboration. Researchers led by Gareth Hollands analyzed 72 studies over the last 35 years and found that smaller portions, packages, and tableware consistently lead people to consume less food and drink. […]

The Politics of Obesity Messages

September 18, 2013 — The politics of obesity messages — how the problem is framed — determines how different segments of the public will respond to calls for action. New research from the University of Minnesota, Johns Hopkins, and Cornell adds to our understanding that political ideology shapes our view of obesity. Sarah Gollust and colleagues looked at different […]

Irrationality, Health, and Libertarian Paternalism

August 10, 2013 — Irrationality describes many aspects of healthcare and health behaviors that create vexing problems for health policymakers. Label a food “healthy” and people will consume it in unhealthy quantities. People will insist on getting prescriptions and tests they might not need, but all too often, they don’t follow through with needed tests and prescriptions. Douglas Hough […]