Posts Tagged ‘cognitive function’

Possible Benefits for Brain Function from Obesity Treatment

February 20, 2024 — The potential for benefits to brain function with effective obesity treatment is becoming difficult to miss. In particular, a new observational study of brain function in a cohort of patients receiving metabolic surgery for treatment of obesity is drawing much attention right now in JAMA Network Open. It suggests the possibility of a lasting benefit […]

The Phantom Paradox of Obesity and Brain Function

May 27, 2021 — Two serious health concerns – obesity and loss of brain function – intersect in curious ways. Good evidence suggests that obesity in early and mid life can have a negative effect on cognition. But later in life, the story is a bit fuzzier. In fact, some researchers have suggested the opposite might be true for […]

Desk Jobs Are Good for Your Brain?

July 10, 2020 — The common wisdom and scientific evidence holds that physical activity helps your brain function better. Too much sitting time supposedly gets in the way of good cognitive function But now, a new observational study suggests that sedentary desk jobs might be good for your brain. What gives? A Counter-Intuitive Observational Study The first thing to […]

Looking for the Best Exercise for Brain Health?

December 11, 2018 — High intensity interval training (HIIT) just got another boost in the scientific literature. A new study in Experimental Biology and Medicine tells us that HIIT might be especially helpful for brain health in people with obesity. Small Study, Surrogate Endpoint This is a fascinating study. Researchers evaluated the effect of HIIT and more moderate exercise […]

Three Clues for Treating Obesity in the Brain

July 26, 2014 — Brain function appears to be linked with obesity in a number of ways that neurosicientists are only beginning to understand. In Physiology & Behavior, Ashley Martin and Terry Davidson recently published a detailed review of clues that link cognitive function to obesity in a vicious cycle where the distinction between cause and effect are blurred. […]