Posts Tagged ‘health outcomes’

A Modest Proposal: Treat Obesity Seriously

December 2, 2019 — We have a chronic disease problem. It started in America. It’s spreading all around the world. And already in the U.S. it’s playing a major role in reversing long-term gains in life expectancy. Yet, the response has been tepid, says William Dietz with two commentaries published in the last month. Dietz is Director of the […]

Drinking for Weight Loss: Results Will Vary

December 1, 2019 — It seems like a simple proposition. Stop drinking your calories. Drink water or other non-caloric beverages instead. In the calories-in-calories-out way of thinking, weight loss will be automatic. Drink only water and you’ll be drinking for weight loss. The CHOICE  Study This study actually tested the drinking for weight loss proposition. It was a rigorous […]

Sizzling Headlines About Brain Damage

November 29, 2019 — The PR team at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) hit a home run this week. They were playing in the ongoing contest to create the most misinformative but sizzling headlines about scientific research. Their winning headline was doozy: MRI reveals brain damage in obese teens. Of course, that misleading press release was only […]

Better Life and Health for Teens After Bariatric Surgery

November 22, 2019 — New data this week adds to our view of life and health for teens after bariatric surgery. Both are better for most of them after bariatric surgery. This week’s data deals with quality of life, pain, physical function, and kidney function. Two new studies document important benefits from the surgery. One other study offers an […]

My Story, A Dietitian’s Story of Obesity

November 21, 2019 — I’ve had obesity since early childhood. This is my story of living with it. In my immigrant Italian family, chubby children were considered “healthy,” a sign of “making it.” I was lovingly, but, unwittingly, overfed. Up until my early 20s, nothing worked to control my dietary intake or for lasting fat loss. I knew back […]

A Sad Tale of Two Bypass Surgeries

November 18, 2019 — Let’s talk about two different kinds of bypass surgeries. Both of them are the subject of studies presented at the American Heart Association’s scientific meeting this past weekend. But that’s where the similarities end. Operation C We’ll call the first of these procedures Operation C. More than 200,000 people have these surgeries done every year. […]

Toddler Diets: Sugar Down, Obesity Up, Now What?

November 15, 2019 — Toddler diets can’t seem to fall in line with dietary guidelines. About 98 percent of toddlers are eating added sugar! That’s the headline in the New York Times today on a study in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. In that same article, the Times buried the fact that added sugar consumption […]

ObesityWeek: Real Answers for Tough Questions

November 3, 2019 — It’s fairly easy to spot the people peddling empty hype as the answer for obesity, nutrition, and health. To answer tough questions, they tell us it’s really quite simple. We’re all loading up on too much toxic sugar, they might say. In the Federalist last week, James DeLong wrote that Americans are fat “because they’re […]

Digging Into a Squishy Definition for Ultra-Processed Food

October 30, 2019 — Everyone was ready to head home from FNCE 2019 yesterday morning. Yet a crowd gathered to hear from Kevin Hall and Amber Courville about ultra-processed foods. Theirs is the fascinating study that shows people eat more calories and gain more weight on a diet of processed foods. It’s a study that seems quite important. But […]

Sustainable Diets Are Good, But All Diets Are Bad

October 29, 2019 — FNCE – the world’s largest meeting of food and nutrition experts – is winding up today in Philly. It’s an occasion where more than 10,000 dietitians, food professionals, and policymakers gather. The experience is sensory overload on food and nutrition. Without a doubt, passions run high on nutrition beliefs at this meeting. For instance, the […]