Posts Tagged ‘health outcomes’

Looking for Health Outcomes from Health Policies

June 17, 2019 — Everything is effective. Give somebody a potent drug and it will surely do something to them. Enact a health policy and it will surely have an effect. In fact, the effects will certainly be many – both desired and undesired. But for both drugs and health policies, the target is health. So we’d best be […]

Tantalizing Data and Ample Buzz for Personalized Nutrition

June 11, 2019 — It was quite a splash. Near simultaneous presentations in Baltimore and San Francisco. For the last two days, Tim Spector and colleagues have been busy presenting data from an ambitious study of personalized nutrition. They had a late breaking poster at the American Diabetes Association meeting. Also, they made two presentations at American Society of […]

Youth-Onset Diabetes: Ample Reason for Concern

June 10, 2019 — If the recent news of diabetes incidence going down seemed like great news, let’s remember there’s a flip side to that. In youth, type 2 diabetes is still rising. At the American Diabetes Association (ADA) scientific meeting, researchers spelled out the implication. Youth-onset diabetes (type 2) is harsh. Complications come faster and they hit harder. […]

PIONEER Studies Converge at the ADA Meeting

June 9, 2019 — Some of the most discussed news coming from the American Diabetes Association Scientific Sessions in San Francisco is all about the PIONEER studies of oral semaglutide. This drug is presently under review at FDA for type 2 diabetes. Interest is keen because it will be the first of its class that doesn’t require an injection. […]

How’s Your Regularity – of Sleep?

June 8, 2019 — A new study in Diabetes Care is telling us that irregular sleep patterns have a clear association with obesity and metabolic dysfunction. It’s more than just how much we sleep. In fact, this study is all about the regularity of sleep patterns. So does this mean that irregular sleeping patterns will cause obesity? Not exactly. […]

The Humble Glycemic Index Marks Global Diabetes Risk

June 7, 2019 — It’s been a wild ride. Almost 40 years ago, David Jenkins published the first paper to propose that the glycemic index of foods might be an important measure of nutrition quality. Back then, dietary guidance pointed to a low-fat panacea. Research continued quietly on the glycemic index. The pendulum swung from fear of fats to […]

Red or White, Too Much Meat Can Be a Problem

June 5, 2019 — For nearly five decades now, beef consumption has been dropping. Poultry has risen. Why? Because of a steady stream of warnings that red meat raises the risk of heart disease. But a new study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition raises questions about this conventional wisdom. In a randomized, controlled study, researchers found no […]

Sweetness and Light, Bias and Fear

June 4, 2019 — Canada’s latest dietary guidelines make it clear. Cut the sugar. Avoid any other sweeteners. Water should be what you’re drinking. And also, enjoy your food. Dietary guideline writers don’t have much of a taste for sweetness these days. But humans do. How shall we cope? The Rising Bias Against Sweeteners The prevailing bias holds that […]

Peer Reviewed Speculation About Labeling Added Sugars

June 3, 2019 — Disclosing how much added sugar is in a food product is a good idea. Claiming it “will save millions of lives and billions of dollars” is not. Wandering away from the truth never is. But in Circulation last month, Yue Huang et al are bold to say they only have one worry about the precision […]

Might Universal Basic Income Reduce Obesity?

June 2, 2019 — Universal basic income is generating some buzz in this election cycle. Presidential candidate Andrew Yang is pushing this idea of a guaranteed income for every adult. No strings attached. But Alaska already has it. Since 1983, the state’s Permanent Fund Dividend has provided an annual, unconditional, and universal income to Alaskans. What’s more, economists are […]