Posts Tagged ‘health policy’

A Political Campaign for Dietary Guidelines

December 31, 2019 — A band of low-carb enthusiasts is making it official. They are coming at the process for developing the 2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans as a matter of politics. Why worry about the nuances of science when you can rally a base of devoted advocates? The Low-Carb Action Network This coalition formed in December with a […]

A Glimpse of Progress in America’s Once Fattest City

April 15, 2019 — We’re not especially fond of rankings for obesity. They can spark sensationalism. Back in 2008, journalists had great fun with a CDC report that identified Huntington, WV, as “America’s fattest city.” Jamie Oliver swooped in to offer an enlightened diet to the city and its children. He sobbed for the cameras when the city didn’t […]

A Lean New Deal to Reverse the Obesity Syndemic

April 1, 2019 — A broad coalition of health, nutrition, environmental, and animal rights activists are creating quite a stir today with an ambitious new policy proposal. The Lean New Deal aims to stop the obesity syndemic in its tracks. At the same time, it will erase the problem of climate change if fully implemented. This is the product […]

Modeling How Obesity Moves Through the Population

April 8, 2018 — Questions of how and why the pandemic of obesity has progressed through the whole earth’s population defies simple answers. Even more vexing is the question of how to change these dynamics. In Obesity, Keisuke Ejima, Diana Thomas, and David Allison have published new modeling that offers clues for answering these questions. Genetic Susceptibility Obesity moves through […]

Obesity Blocks the Path to Military Readiness Goals

March 1, 2018 — The numbers are daunting. More than 70 percent of young Americans between 17 and 24 cannot serve in the U.S. military. Why? The soaring prevalence of obesity is at the top of the list. According to a new Heritage Foundation report, this means military readiness goals might be impossible to meet: The U.S. military is […]

The Comfort of Opinion Without the Discomfort of Thought

February 3, 2018 — Are we enjoying the comfort of our opinions within familiar circles, free from disquieting thought? All too often, the answer is yes. After all, critical thinking can be unpleasant. Perhaps we should note that this concern is nothing new. Consider this excerpt from a commencement address delivered at Yale by President John F. Kennedy. June […]

How Do We Feel About Vulnerable People?

December 25, 2017 — Words have power. And today, the powerful word that’s on our mind is vulnerable. Many people today are celebrating the birth a vulnerable baby thousands of years ago. A Banned Word? Last week, political reporters were chattering about a list of words to avoid in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The direction […]

Virtue at Every Size

June 1, 2017 — Bless his heart. Michael Bloomberg means well. And he’s done a lot of good for the health of New Yorkers. Life expectancy is up. He boldly took on smoking and trans fats. He’s worked tirelessly to nudge New Yorkers toward healthier diets and more active lives. Nibbling on blackberries, grapes, and carrots – artifacts of virtue – he lamented to Frank […]

Whom Shall We Blame for Obesity?

April 4, 2017 — Affixing blame is an ancient human ritual. Affixing blame helps people make sense of a situation and move on to solving a problem. In the ancient scripture of Leviticus, the community places its sins upon a goat and casts the goat into the desert. It’s the original scapegoat. With sins removed, everyone can get on with […]

Through the Looking Glass of Healthcare

September 28, 2013 — We seem to have gone through the looking glass of healthcare into Alice’s Wonderland where nothing makes sense. Consider what’s unfolding before us. One end of the political spectrum is busy selling insurance for an industry hoping to get millions of new customers. An enthusiastic hospital industry is joining the effort because they see a […]