Posts Tagged ‘scientific rigor’

Food Addiction: Adding to Obesity Stigma?

September 20, 2021 — The concept of food addiction holds strong sway in popular culture. You can find tips for overcoming it. WebMD will tell you how to diagnose and treat it. Psychiatrist Anna Lembke has a book to sell you. In Dopamine Nation, she describes the source of addictive behaviors linked to food, phones, and sex. It was […]

Tortured Logic About Obesity Prevention

August 31, 2021 — Can an ineffective program to prevent obesity be cost effective? Our first impulse is to say no. But a new paper in Obesity Science and Practice says yes. Mariette Derwig and colleagues tested a child-centered approach in Sweden. They found no effect in their well-designed study. However, this inconvenient result did not get in the […]

Seriously? 1 Hot Dog = 36 Minutes Less of Healthy Life?

August 26, 2021 — Remember when the pandemic was new and we were not allowed to laugh? They canceled April Fool’s Day in 2020. Well, today it’s back. We refuse to believe this press release from the University of Michigan School of Public Health is not a prank. Their environmental scientists are telling us that one hot dog will […]

Learning About Following the Uncertainty of Science

August 23, 2021 — No two ways about it, we’re all getting a crash course in the uncertainty of science. It turns out that all those bumper stickers saying follow the science don’t mean exactly what we thought. Because COVID-19 is teaching us that the certainty we seek from science is not always there for us. Little more than […]

Ten Ways Bias Creeps into Randomized Studies

July 30, 2021 — Improving health through nutrition is important. Relieving the considerable suffering that obesity causes is likewise important. But both of these tasks are difficult. That’s because clear evidence for cause and effect is hard to find in nutrition and obesity. Randomized studies are hard. Observational studies are more common, but they are subject to bias from […]

Pandemic Weight Gain? Not So Fast

July 19, 2021 — You might think that weight gain during the pandemic is simply a matter of fact. The editor of the Harvard Health Letter tells us it’s widespread. Speculation started early in the pandemic. With everyone cooped up at home, people spoke with certainty and derision about the quarantine 15. Or pandemic pounds. One paper even proclaimed […]

Casting the Net for a Colon Cancer Problem with SSBs

July 7, 2021 — The best thing to demonize is sugar-sweetened beverages, says Harvard’s Mary Bassett. She pointed this out at the Roundtable on Obesity Solutions last month. Thus, yet another paper from Harvard about yet another danger of drinking something sweet is no surprise. This time, it’s about a link between SSBs and colon cancer. In fact, to […]

Morning Chocolate Miracles? Not Quite

July 5, 2021 — “Eating chocolate for breakfast can supercharge your weight loss!” This headline and many more came from a new paper in the FASEB Journal. In fact, Altmetric tells us this paper has so far generated 113 stories from 93 news outlets. In less than two weeks since publication, it has grabbed attention that puts it in […]

Yes, the COVID-19 Vaccine Is Still Working Well

June 29, 2021 — “Translate for me, please. Is this paper saying vaccines don’t work as well for people with obesity?” This question came from a dear friend and the short answer is no. That’s not what this paper shows. The paper in question is a preprint – which means essentially that it is a draft report of research […]

Waiting for Godot and for SSB Taxes to Work

June 25, 2021 — In the realm of obesity and public health, the role of sugar-sweetened drinks in obesity is an article of faith. Questioning it will get you a tongue-lashing at best, but more likely, shunned. Likewise, the cool kids in public health expect you to agree that SSB taxes work. Yet again, we have a new study […]