Posts Tagged ‘scientific rigor’

The Perfectly Natural Bias for a White Hat

October 15, 2018 — Never underestimate the power of rationalization. Because sounds good, very often, is good enough. Just ask folks selling “natural” foods and drinks. A good story about natural purity fetches premium prices. Also, you should look at new research on white hat bias. Even for researchers, it seems the ends can justify the means. It’s a […]

Registering a Grievance About Grievance Studies

October 5, 2018 — Who are they to judge? Overcoming anthropometry through fat bodybuilding. The journal Fat Studies published and has now retracted that hoax study. But this was not a one-off hoax. It was part of a series, concocted to make a point. Academic grievance studies are corrupting scholarship, say Helen Pluckrose, James A. Lindsay, and Peter Boghossian. Harvard lecturer Yascha Mounk […]

A Clean Connection to Childhood Obesity?

September 21, 2018 — Perhaps your mother told you cleanliness is next to godliness. That concept found its way into a 1778 sermon by John Wesley. But it’s even older than that. Ancient Babylonian and Hebrew religious texts have the earliest references. Now, CMAJ wants to put cleanliness next to obesity. Could there be a clean connection? An Association with […]

Time to Cook Up Some New Dietary Guidelines

September 20, 2018 — Ready or not, new Dietary Guidelines for Americans are coming our way in 2020. In the midst of our polarized politics, you can be sure that this round will have some difficult twists and turns. No More One Size Fits All The new dietary guidelines will follow a life stage approach. USDA and HHS organized […]

Magical Time-Restricted Eating

September 19, 2018 — Time-restricted eating is a popular concept right now. So naturally it’s great clickbait. Some journals and researchers are happy to seize the opportunity to gain attention. Newly published in the Journal of Nutritional Science, we have an especially sharp example. Jonathan Johnston is grabbing sensational headlines with his study of 13 people for ten weeks. […]

Shouldn’t Nutrition Education Control Obesity?

September 18, 2018 — Knowledge is power, right? So why doesn’t nutrition education – by itself – resolve our problems with obesity? Maybe we just haven’t tried hard enough. Or maybe knowledge is helpful. But it’s insufficient for overcoming obesity. Just like any other disease. A test of health promotion for Turkish children with obesity provides an good case study. […]

Which Bad Dietary Advice Caused Obesity to Grow?

September 16, 2018 — Perhaps the backlash against decades of faulty low-fat dietary guidelines is peaking. It’s now popular to suggest that bad dietary advice in the 1980s sparked the epidemic of obesity that’s still booming today. But like so many other glib proclamations on the subject, this one is probably wrong. Or at the very least, it glosses […]

Nudges: A Thousand Tiny Band-Aids for a Thousand Tiny Cuts

September 8, 2018 — Using a small spoon might be a useful tool for preventing weight gain and obesity. That’s the claim you’ll find at the end of a new study in the British Journal of Nutrition. Like many other little nudges, smaller spoons seem to have have an impact on eating behaviors. But like the metaphor of a […]

A Hard Look at Defining Fitness to Serve

September 6, 2018 — Fitness to serve might be a subjective matter for some jobs. But for serving in the military it’s critical to be absolutely objective. And right now, 71 percent of young adults are not fit to serve in the U.S. military. A key reason for that is high rates of obesity. It’s also a key reason […]

Big, Bad, and Unfortunate Mistakes

September 2, 2018 — The bigs are out to get us. Really. Big food, big government, big agriculture, big medicine, big marketing, big academia, and more. We could go on, but no need. When all these bigs align, some big, bad, and unfortunate mistakes can fall out. A self-professed angry old man – George Lundberg – outlines a case study in […]