Posts Tagged ‘scientific rigor’

Will Skim Milk Save You from Aging?

January 20, 2020 — Skim milk can be whatever you want. To some people (we confess) it seems like a disgusting example of fake food. To others it’s an exemplar for healthy nutrition. For that latter crowd, a new study points to an association of slower aging with drinking skim or low-fat milk. Is this a benefit you can […]

What Explains Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Obesity?

January 8, 2020 — What could it be that explains racial and ethnic disparities in obesity? The most common thought is that it’s all about differences in health behaviors, along with social and economic status. The thinking is that poverty and educational disadvantages make it hard to eat healthy and stay fit. But a new study in Obesity tells […]

Fathers and Daughters, Exercise, and Scientific Rigor

December 29, 2019 — Can fathers have a significant effect on physical activity in the lives of their daughters? This is an important question. Because right now, girls entering secondary school often don’t have fundamental movement skills that predict lifelong physical activity. Though we have plenty of data to say that fathers more often participate in physical activity with […]

Scientific Excellence Is a Male Thing, Apparently

December 18, 2019 — Apparently, “excellence” in scientific research is a male thing. So, too, is novelty. And let’s not forget uniqueness or promise either. A new study published in the BMJ tells us that male authors are much more likely to use these superlatives in the research papers they author. Female authors, not so much. “Supportive” was the […]

Hypothetical Food Labeling, Hypothetical Effects

December 13, 2019 — Food labeling is quite an attractive tool for preventing obesity. Let’s help people make good, informed choices! That’s the commendable thinking behind this approach. This week, a special variant on food labeling is getting a lot of attention in the media. It’s called PACE – physical activity calorie equivalent – labeling. England’s Royal Society of […]

Obesity Prevention: Proving a Point or Seeking the Facts?

December 11, 2019 — It sounds wonderful. This program is ideal for integrating health promotion more intensively into the everyday life of children. Best of all, it only takes is a very low dose of encouragement to Join the Healthy Boat. It’s easy and effective, say the folks who designed and tested this incredible program. But we can’t help […]

Collaborating for Analytical Integrity Around the World

December 7, 2019 —   An unexpected privilege comes from sharing information on this site every day. It’s the opportunity for collaborating with really smart people from all over the world. All to promote better science for better health. So today’s post is a simple expression of gratitude to Andrew Brown and every one of his collaborators on our […]

Fighting for the Moral High Ground of Nutrition

November 30, 2019 — Human history is full of bloody conflicts to claim moral high ground. The Thirty Years’ War pitted the Holy Roman Empire against Protestant states. But we can find nothing holy in the carnage that resulted. Now we wage our wars on twitter. And true believers go at it to claim the moral high ground of […]

Sizzling Headlines About Brain Damage

November 29, 2019 — The PR team at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) hit a home run this week. They were playing in the ongoing contest to create the most misinformative but sizzling headlines about scientific research. Their winning headline was doozy: MRI reveals brain damage in obese teens. Of course, that misleading press release was only […]

Elusive Obesity Culprits: Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals

November 25, 2019 — The assumption is everywhere. Obesity is simply the result of “eating too much and moving too little…poor diet and lifestyle choices.” So says the UK’s National Health Service. But in fact, it’s not so simple. And it’s worth considering the impact of drugs and other chemicals that nudge us to a higher weight. These are […]