Posts Tagged ‘scientific rigor’

Is This Study Legit? Five Questions to Ask

October 15, 2019 — Who doesn’t want to know if drinking that second or third cup of coffee a day will improve your memory, or if sleeping too much increases your risk of a heart attack? We’re invested in staying healthy and many of us are interested in reading about new research findings to help us make sense of […]

Debunking the Debunking of Nutrition Beliefs

October 10, 2019 — Debunking the sacred cows of nutrition makes for fabulous clickbait. But we wonder if it’s helping. Right now, two different examples are generating a lot of heat, but not much enlightenment. One is the never ending debate about the role of carbohydrates and insulin in obesity. The other is a recent review of the evidence […]

A Red Meat Issue Flames Up

October 1, 2019 — “I am outraged and bewildered,” says Christopher Gardner. The line forms back there, Professor Gardner. Five – yes, five – papers in the Annals of Internal Medicine today are whipping up a flaming hot controversy about nutrition guidance broadly and red meat specifically. The bottom line from all these papers? Maybe we need to admit […]

Sugar: Solve for the Answer You Like

September 29, 2019 — The assumption that too much sugar explains our problem with obesity has become ambient white noise. Most people just accept it. Inconvenient facts fade into oblivion. Modelers grab the megaphone claiming to have evidence that sugar is the cause and the key for overcoming obesity. It’s easy enough to solve for the answer you like […]

What Works for Obesity, if Not Shaming?

September 19, 2019 — Popular culture is having a moment. All the talk about fat shaming that started two weeks ago is still echoing through the media – supporting a clear view that explicit weight bias is a bad thing. Apparently some people really did think that shaming people might be a tool for making them healthier. So the […]

Thinsplaining the Ease of Calorie Restriction

September 1, 2019 — Easy peasy. That’s how a thinsplaining cardiology professor describes long-term calorie restriction. He did it in one of JAMA‘s most popular articles this week. That article is a news report on a study of calorie reduction and cardiometabolic health. The treatment group in this RCT cut about 300 calories from their diet for two years. […]

Junk Food Kills, Protective Food Saves, Hallelujah!

August 29, 2019 — Our food is killing too many of us. Healthcare is expensive and Americans are sick. Much sicker than many realize. Ten dietary factors are killing a thousand people every day in America. What shall we do? Count on protective food to save us. Out with the junk. In with protective nutrition. This gospel of dietary […]

Ten Tools for Exaggeration in Pediatric Obesity Studies

August 21, 2019 — Tall tales are not just for the literature of Mark Twain. In fact, you can find a few in childhood obesity. A new paper in Obesity Reviews offers an inventory of ten methods for exaggeration of effectiveness in childhood obesity studies. Andrew Brown and colleagues (including ConscienHealth’s Ted Kyle) provide examples of each. Checklists can […]

Spin, Pilots, and Sacred Cows of Obesity Care

August 15, 2019 — Beware of pilot studies with claims of effectiveness. “A pilot study is not a hypothesis testing study,” says Andrew Leon in a cogent summary of what pilots can and can’t do. But it’s oh so tempting to jump on effect data from a pilot study. Especially when you believe in what you think it tells […]

Jogging Beats Genes for Obesity? Not Exactly

August 5, 2019 — Facts are stubborn. So, too, is an entrenched bias. The bias that obesity is a simple matter of choice runs especially deep. Thus it creeps into headlines and even scientific journals. A new study in PLOS Genetics provides a vivid case in point. Unwarranted causal language in a paper flows through to a press release. […]