Posts Tagged ‘scientific rigor’

ObesityWeek: Real Answers for Tough Questions

November 3, 2019 — It’s fairly easy to spot the people peddling empty hype as the answer for obesity, nutrition, and health. To answer tough questions, they tell us it’s really quite simple. We’re all loading up on too much toxic sugar, they might say. In the Federalist last week, James DeLong wrote that Americans are fat “because they’re […]

Seeing What We Want to See in Soda Policy

November 1, 2019 — Objectivity is having a rough time these days. This is true whether the subject is politics, policy, or even a study in a medical journal. Very often, believing is seeing. Not the other way around. A new study on soda policy in JAMA Internal Medicine provides a case in point. Improving Metabolic Profile Very Effortlessly […]

Sustainable Diets Are Good, But All Diets Are Bad

October 29, 2019 — FNCE – the world’s largest meeting of food and nutrition experts – is winding up today in Philly. It’s an occasion where more than 10,000 dietitians, food professionals, and policymakers gather. The experience is sensory overload on food and nutrition. Without a doubt, passions run high on nutrition beliefs at this meeting. For instance, the […]

Jumping Rope, Cognition, Height, BMI, and Scientific Rigor

October 26, 2019 — Does jumping rope help teens with obesity? We’re honestly not too sure. But a study that suggests it might is certainly stimulating some excellent dialogue between scholars. And it points to some surprising questions. For instance: does jumping rope for 75 minutes, twice a week over 12 weeks make teens grow taller? Think better? Become […]

Real Evidence for Steps to Prevent Dementia

October 25, 2019 — Any number of people want to sell you magic steps to prevent dementia. Lumosity had to pay a two million dollar fine in 2016 because it “preyed on consumer fears about age related cognitive decline.” But that hasn’t stopped the company. It’s just being more careful about falsely promoting its game to prevent dementia. Nonetheless, […]

Three Fixes for a Media Diet of Questionable Science

October 21, 2019 — Will leafy green vegetables prevent dementia? Or does living near heavy traffic cause it? Writing in JAMA, John Ioannidis describes a media diet of questionable science and minor issues. Meanwhile, more substantial health concerns get little attention. He also offers some constructive ideas for improving the the situation. 1. Focus on Bigger Issues Scientific articles […]

Can Happy Rats Tell Us Something About Obesity?

October 20, 2019 — All around us, we read mostly collegial (sometimes acrimonious) debates about how to do obesity and nutrition research right. Are randomized, controlled studies the best way to get definitive answers? What about nutritional epidemiology? Or animal studies? Some of these debates about methods and inferences are raucous. For a note of caution, we offer a […]

Is This Study Legit? Five Questions to Ask

October 15, 2019 — Who doesn’t want to know if drinking that second or third cup of coffee a day will improve your memory, or if sleeping too much increases your risk of a heart attack? We’re invested in staying healthy and many of us are interested in reading about new research findings to help us make sense of […]

Debunking the Debunking of Nutrition Beliefs

October 10, 2019 — Debunking the sacred cows of nutrition makes for fabulous clickbait. But we wonder if it’s helping. Right now, two different examples are generating a lot of heat, but not much enlightenment. One is the never ending debate about the role of carbohydrates and insulin in obesity. The other is a recent review of the evidence […]

A Red Meat Issue Flames Up

October 1, 2019 — “I am outraged and bewildered,” says Christopher Gardner. The line forms back there, Professor Gardner. Five – yes, five – papers in the Annals of Internal Medicine today are whipping up a flaming hot controversy about nutrition guidance broadly and red meat specifically. The bottom line from all these papers? Maybe we need to admit […]