Posts Tagged ‘weight discrimination’

A Lifetime of Medical Neglect

June 23, 2019 — Obesity presents many problems. But two of them rise to the top: access to care and bias. Yesterday, at the Harvard Blackburn obesity course, Caroline Apovian reminded us why. Too often, people with obesity endure a lifetime of derision and medical neglect. With facts and case histories, she painted a searing picture of the suffering […]

Exercising Power Over People with Obesity

June 21, 2019 — It’s easy to lose sight of power dynamics in obesity. “Instruct the patient to lose weight.” For years, that was the standard prescription for dealing with obesity in primary care. It is worse than useless advice. People with obesity dread hearing a condescending lecture from health providers. That’s because power dynamics matter. We live in […]

Killing Us Gently with Implicit Weight Bias

May 14, 2019 — We’re making progress. Right? Explicit fat shaming is no longer cool. But then again, we see implicit weight bias on the rise. It’s subtle. It often comes in healthcare – “for your own good.” Yesterday, it smacked us in the face when we read this from a distinguished bariatric surgery program explaining about a new […]

Workplace Wellness That Promotes Stigma, Not Health

May 6, 2019 — Workplace wellness sounds like such a benign concept – maybe even beneficent. So why does it sometimes spark such anger from employees? And why aren’t workplace wellness programs working to yield better health? A recent paper from Frontiers in Psychology offers important insights. Senior author Stuart Flint sums it up: Problems arise when these programs […]

ECPO at ECO: Patient Advocacy in Europe Takes Shape

May 2, 2019 — At ECO 2019, we saw an important new movement emerge – an independent European patient advocacy organization. EASO provides some of the details on this important new organization, which we will know as ECPO: EASO is delighted to announce the launch of the new EASO ECPO – the European Coalition for People Living with Obesity. […]

Canadian Obesity Summit: Taking Action Against Weight Bias

April 25, 2019 — At the sixth Canadian Obesity Summit on Wednesday, three of Canada’s top experts on weight bias presented diverse views on taking action against weight bias. The focus ranged from reducing bias in new healthcare providers to internalized bias and health at every size. Though these experts brought diverse perspectives, they shared a common focus. Reducing […]

Weight Bias: When Prejudice Stops Progress

April 11, 2019 — “I am ashamed to work in a healthcare profession that treats people in such a manner,” says Rachel Batterham. Batterham is a brilliant researcher and professor of obesity, diabetes, and endocrinology. But on Wednesday at the fourth World Congress on Interventional Therapies for Type 2 Diabetes, she reached outside of her comfort zone to talk […]

Metabolic Surgery: Changing Hearts and Minds

April 9, 2019 — The logic is inescapable. Type 2 diabetes is a cruel, progressive disease that slowly, but surely destroys a body from the inside out.Strokes, heart disease, amputations, organ failure – they’re all part of a bleak picture. Intensive medical care can slow it down. But metabolic surgery can put it into remission. Three years ago, a […]

Explicitly Dehumanizing People with Obesity

April 5, 2019 — Why is implicit weight bias growing while other forms of implicit bias are dropping? Here’s one reason: routine and explicit dehumanization. A new study in Obesity documents a stark reality. Our culture is dehumanizing people with obesity. Furthermore, dehumanization provides an excuse for policies to discriminate against people living with obesity. Less Than Human Through a […]

Public Health Messages That Help or Hurt

March 30, 2019 — This is tricky. On Friday, the HHS Office on Women’s Health gathered a very diverse group. We came together to talk about talking about health behaviors and body image. The talk that has people concerned is in public health messages meant to promote health. But sadly, public health messaging – however well intended – sometimes […]